Monday, October 8, 2018

Business Etiquette Dinner The Short Course Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

      
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1. Learn how to survive a mocktail party: how to hold a napkin, glass, and a plate, in your left hand, functionally.

2. Drink: (without poking someone in the eye;) keep your elbows and arms down close to your sides. Pour liquid into your mouth, from your wrist. Do this silently. Know how to respond to an offer of an alcoholic drink. During daylight, order a “Virgin” drink over a “Non-Alcoholic one.” It is easier to say. Appear to be drinking less than the host, hostess, or person who is picking up the tap. At an evening event, make any drink Virgin (especially after your first.) When not drinking, keep your right hand warm, dry, and free.
3. Mingle. Be good company. Know where to wear that name badge. Do introductions (correctly,) senior then junior or junior to senior. When someone gives you a business card, know what to do with it and what to have to give back.
4. Learn seats of honor: where to stop at a table. At a family dinner, know an invocation acceptable to your host’s culture.
5. Place a napkin in your lap before eating or drinking anything.
6. Maintain your cover: (place setting for one,) or establish one.
7. Look for drinks to be served from the right (refreshing.) Look for glasses in a place setting to be left in place until after you have left the table, (unless it is a pre-dinner drink served on a napkin, or you are doing very formal dining.) Learn what to do after reading that reusable menu.
8. Look for food to be served (counter-clockwise) from the left (leaving.)
9 Take small amounts of food. (Eat in courses over eating in piles.) Avoid taking too little, or too much, or more in visual calories than those dining around you. Try a little of everything unless restricted by religion, health, or culture.
10. Avoid leaving teeth marks in bread that you are eating. Avoid bread until you receive an entrée; remember bread is not a first course.
11. Eat each meal in an accepted style. Know which fork to use and when and how. Cut items in only one direction, one or two pieces at a time. (Yes, you may eat only one thing at a time.) Avoid eating too little, too much, or too fast, or acting as if the meal is to be your last. Make as little noise as possible.
12. When at a loss as to how to eat a particular dish, watch the person who made or ordered it. You can ask, "How am I to eat this?" The lesson most likely will begin with a smile.
13. Avoid adding salt or pepper to food, unless it is to radishes, celery, corn, a potato or salad. When salt is requested, ensure both pepper and salt are passed.
14. (Sit up straight. Bring food to you.) Close your mouth around the edge of any fork placed in it. Chew each portion twenty-four times, with your mouth closed, and saver each bite. Taste buds live and digestion begins in the month not the stomach – yes that’s right.
15. Place your implements in the rest position for the style in which you are eating, anytime you want.
16. Take a hand rest often. Rest the heels of your hands on the edge of the table. You can rest your elbows on the table - in between courses. (Continentally, you can talk with a knife and fork in your hands. Keep them low.)
17. Talk, in business, some unseen food can still be in your mouth. Keep the people at your table company. (Remember, for some, your conversation is the entertainment.) Talk about things other than work (unless it is the purpose for the meal). Know what to do when someone stops to visit you at table.
18. Pace yourself. Eat each course in such a manner as to finish it along with the person to your right. In public, leave a little something of each course on your plate, and of each drink in each glass. Leave each course plate in position until it is removed by a waitperson or replaced by the next plate. Look for food to be removed from the right (retrieving.) (Avoid helping: passing your plates, unless asked, even when you use to wait tables. At dinner is not the place to display this trait.)
19. When it is time, “Take a break.” Before temporarily leaving the table place flatware in the rest position for the style in which you are eating; get up; place your napkin in your chair. When its time, sing the company song. When it is time, dance. Let the host pay (and tip) where required.
20. Before permanently leaving a table, place flatware in the finished position for the style in which you are eating.
21. Place your napkin in a mock fold to the left of your place setting, (again napkin to the side.) Avoid putting any napkin on your used plate or in any glass. Avoid staking plates or making plates"trash." Get up and push in your chair until it is six inches away from the edge of the table.
22. Say thank you. Then, say thanks again later by note.
23. Remember reciprocity. Read and research as much as possible the culture in which you will be the host. Watch each act of eating with an open mind, eye, and heart. Practice diligently. While eating in company, there are things to learn and do. – Dining is a Dance, University Etiquette Business Dining 101, this is the short course.

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Sunday, October 7, 2018

Flatware Etiquette - The Rule of Three & Rule of Ten Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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The line to the food begins with the menu order of courses. Flatware is to be set on a table based on a menu: which courses will be served and when.
Have no fear. In an advanced formal place setting, there is a flatware rule of three: no more than three items of flatware of any one kind are to be placed in any place setting at any one time. An oyster cocktail fork can be placed with up to three other forks in a place setting. It is the lone exception to the rule of three. It can be placed to the left of other forks or tines in the bowl of the soup spoon handle to five o’clock.
And then there is the rule of ten: no more than ten pieces of flatware of any kind are to be placed at one place setting at any given time.
Each course is to get its own flatware placed in order of use outside in – in kind: all knives and then all spoons.
Study place settings even when alone. There are other flatware combinations of ten. Each is an informal place setting. In a formal place setting, not only is the bread and butter plate and butter spreader to be omitted from a place setting, but after some point, additional flatware items can be brought in with the course requiring it.

Get Etiquette Outclass the Competition


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Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
What they say, "Everyone eats this way."  Ok then,  get etiquette, outclass the competition. Two pre-steps: RSVP    Accept the ‘kind’ invitation, and identify meal restrictions.   Note the dress request.  In addition to the universal rule for eating in company, "_(Eat Something)  after you leave home.” Get coupons and get directions.
Because the more you climb the corporate ladder the more dining protocols matter; there comes a time to transcend coffee shop habits and dining hallways and to display rules of etiquette for business dining. It is a ritual at which more than eating is done. On the way to the top, there are stations and lines at which to stop. 
Station 1. The Meeting Line
1.       Be punctual, __________ whatever this means in your community.      (Occasionally show up _________.)
Station 2. Name Badge Placement
2. Know where to wear that name badge__________________. Get a name badge holder.
Station 3. Something to Drink
3.       Know how to respond to an offer of an alcoholic drink. During daylight, order a___________ over a “Non-Alcoholic one.” It is just easier to say. A juice can be a substitute for an alcoholic drink. Know “What can I get you,” and what it will cost.   Know what to do with that cocktail napkin______________.  4.     Learn to hold a glass by ________.  Lift the glass with the ____________.  
 Avoid the crane; drink without poking someone in the eye; keep your elbows and arms down close to your sides while taking a drink from a glass. When not drinking, keep your ________ warm, dry, and free. Appear to be drinking less than the host, hostess, or person who is picking up the tap. At an evening event, make any drink Virgin (especially after your first.) (And ______________ before you come to or stay at the table.)  5 .       Learn to survive a business party: hold a napkin, glass, and plate in ________hand functionally. 

Job Interview Dining Etiquette Thoughts While You Were Eating University Etiquette Business Dining

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A tray made for someone else requires a placemat. That’s why that paper at Mcky Ds and no mats at a cafeteria or buffet. E (tiquette) is everywhere.
While you were drinking from that opened can, a thought, what a place for a straw, and then from a cup w/o a lid, - a straw? Go figure.
“Happy Birthday to you, Happy Birthday to you, I’ve seen your table manners. You live in a zoo.” – Joan Rivers during her shift at Denny’s.
The difference between a gourmet and a gourmand: one is two steps above a glutton. The other is two steps above a garbage disposal.
“Eating is not a particularly attractive sight” – with living skills keys, this act can be transformed into a sight that is professional and polished.
Teach him something, how to impress an at an interview, or on a date, look at the person with you, not at the plate. Avoid making your feeding the reason for the meeting. Spend your whole life being book smart, gym fit, and fork literate. You can outclass the competition.

Making a Menu Card Professional and Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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 When making a menu card a gap is placed between each section and course. The type of meal, "Breakfast," "Lunch," or "Dinner," may be listed in the upper center the card. The reason a meal is given, "In honor of," or "In celebration of," followed by the name of the person and/or the reason for the event can be listed. These items may be omitted. The word, "Menu," is to be listed at the top and center of the list of courses. Each course is listed down the center of the card, spaced down on a separate line, in the order each is to be served. Formally, each course is listed in French. It may be written in English, in the language of the host, or in the language of the dish. The first letter of each dish is usually capitalized. (In some, each noun seems to have been.) The accompaniment side dish may be listed on the same line as the dish, when served on the same platter, or when it is the sauce for the dish. The side dish or subordinate dish may be listed on the line below the dish in smaller lettering. It may be omitted. In a home, canapés, breads, pickles, relishes, jellies and candies, coffee, and other drinks are omitted from a menu card. The rule, "Do not list the coffee," is broken more often than not. Coffee can be listed, after the dessert course, and the Brandy, if any, may be listed to the left of it. This is less a rule and more of a practice. In a commercial or public dining room, wine may be listed on the menu card to the left of the course it is to accompany. The name of the vineyard is listed followed by the wine type and year in the same or different lettering. A wine could be listed in the lower left corner, when only one wine is served. Wine might be omitted from a menu card. In a private home, wine is to be omitted from a menu card. In formal service, the date of the meal can be listed in French in the lower left or right corner. Informally, the date is listed in the upper right corner. The date may be omitted.

Dining is a Dance There Must be a Hall for Practice

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One dining facility is to have real plates, knives, forks, spoons, glasses, coffee cups, saucers, and napkins. Students need the practice establishing and maintaining a cover: (A Place Setting for One.)
If students are to overcome informal United States of America Café ways they must have exposure to better-equipped cafeterias and formal dining rooms.
Students need the practice establishing a cover; a place setting for one. And hosting dining parties as if they could become one.
“My degree for a cup.” Once I graduate, someone will want to take me to lunch. There the person will see I have little practice using one.
How are you going to attract a date if all you make are garbage plates. When finished napkin on the side. 
While you were drinking from that opened can, a thought, what a place for a straw, and then from a cup w/o a lid,- a straw? Go figure.
If you do not teach class with class what you get is a clod with a degree. Change that. Polish gently.
If the place you drink coffee is the only cafe where you can not get "A cup for here, you have been in the fast food lane too long.
A tray made for someone else requires a place mat. That's why that paper at Micky Ds and no mats at a cafeteria or buffet. E(tiqutte) is everywhere.

Conversation and Prayer in Business Dining Professional College and University Etiquette Business Dining

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Conversation at a table is to begin immediately after people are seated. You can do a self-introduction by saying first to the person on your right and then to your left, "I am ...," followed by your first and last name. You can show your place card and say, "My name." A woman may reply to an introduction by saying "I am...," followed by her first and last name if she is single. If she is married or considerably older than you, she could say, "I am, So and So’s wife." Providing her husband’s first and last name.
At a family meal or an official meal, an invocation may interrupt a conversation. A host is responsible for the invocation. This duty can be delegated to and performed by any person in the assembly. When this person is you, know an invocation acceptable to your host’s culture. Say something "Impromptu" or a standard such as
1. “For what we are about to receive, Lord, make us truly grateful, Amen.” (All or Christian)
2. “God be at our table.” (All)
3. "O Lord, forgive us our sins and bless these gifts in
Jesus' name, Amen. (Christian) or
4. "Bless us, O Lord, and these thy gifts which we are about to receive from thy bounty through Christ our Lord, Amen." (Catholic)
An invocation may be any in which everyone feels comfortable in you saying. One is to be omitted at a business meeting and at a dinner party in a private home. It is the etiquette.
A personal prayer “Let the table conversation stay at the same decibel level as the invocation.” The difference in a cafeteria, café, and a formal dining room anywhere is the decibel level of the conversations in them. Speak with your inside soft voice. Nothing as sweet as being able to hear yourself as you eat.
An invocation may be any in which everyone feels comfortable in you saying.
An invocation can be said at a banquet. One is to be omitted at a business meeting and at a dinner party in a private home.
It is the etiquette.

Wine Service Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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Wine can be served by the glass or by bottle presented at the table. Wine may be served by a Sommelier (wine steward) or by someone designated to do so by the management. In a private home, wine is to be served by a host or by someone designated to do so by the host. The host can ask a man at the other end of the table to "Do the honors.” Each glass can be filled half full, without being lifted from the table. Look for drinks to be served from the right (refreshing.) Informally, wine can be served Family style. It may be passed counterclockwise and each person at the table pours wine into his or her glass. This is usually done only among families. The wine holder and the wine bottle remain on the table until after the meal is over. The bottle can be removed when it is empty. It is to be replaced with a second bottle of the same wine. It can be replaced with a slightly different or slightly heavier variety. Note: To indicate that wine service is to be omitted, a guest can wave two fingers at the rim of the glass, or mouth the words, "No thank you" A cupped hand to the chest and eyes closed can do the same. A guest may limit the amount of wine to be poured with a pinch of the index finger and the thumb; this to ensure the host knows that service was not missed. A guest is to avoid cupping a hand over a glass or turning one upside down.

To Take a Drink of Wine

1. Place your eating implements in the rest position for style in which you are eating. Pat or blot your mouth with the corner of your napkin. Place your napkin back on your lap.

2. Pick up the glass by the stem with the right hand, elbow down and in, and wrist to hand take it to the mouth and take a sip (pour) of the drink. (Avoid the crane.)

3. The rest and finished position for the glass is in the table setting position for it.

4. When someone else is paying for the wine, it is to be sipped, at will, but savored. The wineglass is to be refilled each time it appears to be empty. Take your time.

5. The server is to refill each wineglass without the guest having to ask. It is to be refilled in the same manner as it was first filled.

Virgin wine, sparkling water, or cider could be served in lieu of wine.


Dining Etiquette Table Manners - Thought Pondered While You Were Eating


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Etiquette for Young Professionals and University Seniors


Educated eating is not to take a beating at a university:9 units in life skills is to accompany each degree: (teach) the civil side of business administration.

Thoughts pondered while you were drinking from your Sippy cup - what is in it and (under a roof) why are you using one.

I was impressed with your intellect.  I am still getting over watching you (feeding) eating.

Crumpled napkin on the table, cigarette behind the ear, teeth marks everywhere, and with that sophistication, an I Phone.  Who would have known?

Biting what is being eaten from a bag is how Beauty does her feeding. She, of course, is a horse.

When is a bag not a plate, when you can ask for one.  When sitting, a wrapper can be used as a plate, a better fate and sight than as a sleeve for a sandwich.

A napkin on the table nice, placed on the knee for eating or drinking at table, better.

What we are teaching chemistry, not male care, engineering not eating, and all too clear, why signs appear, "Your mother does not work here."

If it is for my sake you made your bag a garbage plate?  You should not have, really... even for me.





The Line to the Table Station Four Hosting & Seating Arrangements Professional & University Business Dining Etiquette

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1. In a commercial dining room, the event host addresses the commercial host and says, “Hello, table please,” or “My name is" followed by his title and last name, or first and last name, and adds, "I have a reservation" (no numbers, please.) A list can be checked to confirm this. The commercial host may then say, "This way please."
2. When a table is not ready he or she could say, "It'll be just a few minutes." When the party is recalled, the commercial host is to look for and lead the ranking or senior woman to the table by saying, "This way please." The event host follows this woman who will sit on his right. Where there is no commercial host the event host or escort can lead the line to the table.
3. This person who leads the line to the table can direct seating assignments. At a table for eight or more, place cards are to be used to tell people where to stop.
As a rule, when place cards are used, the host is to lead the line to the table with the ranking woman who will sit on his right. He is to be followed by the other women and men in pairs (in close to precedence order.)
4. The hostess enters last with the ranking male guest. Note: the place cards for the host and hostess are to be removed prior to the time people come to the table.
5. When place cards have been omitted, a hostess is to stand at the door to the dining room to direct people to their places. She can direct people to, "Sit anywhere." This direction is to be understood to mean, except at the head or foot of the table, husbands are to be seated opposite and across from their wives, and everybody is to be distributed into mixed pairs. The hostess enters last with the ranking male guest who will sit on her right.
6. At an official meal, the hostess is to lead the line to the table accompanied by a male who will sit on her right: the ranking male guest or the guest of honor when rights of protocol have been waived. She is to be followed by the host and his dinner partner. Others follow in precedence order.
7. At an official function, each man is to precede the woman he is with unless she is the official. At a non-official social function, each woman is to precede the man she is with regardless of rank.

Pre Dinner Drink Napkin Rules Professional and Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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1.     A pre-dinner drink glass is to be given in a glass with a cocktail napkin. OK then, ask for, or go get one. In formal tray service, the glass (with or without a napkin) is considered given when the tray is offered.
2.     In a commercial bar, the drink glass and napkin are considered given when set center the space in front of the person who ordered it. At a table it is set or a napkin or coaster to the right of the last glass. Both items can be served by being given directly to you or directly to the person who requested it. In formal service, this practice is to be avoided.


3.     At a business social party, know what to do with that cocktail napkin. When standing away from a bar, the cocktail napkin is to be picked up and placed on your left hand between the index and middle finger. It can be held between the middle and ring fingers. It may be placed on top of a bar or on a table. It is to be used and treated as both a napkin and a coaster. A napkin has been seen used as a sleeve wrapped around a glass. – Avoid doing this. Away from a bar, a napkin is to be in your hand before you stand and drink anything. The napkin is to be held under the glass without touching it. A napkin may be rested atop a drink that is to be temporarily left. A napkin left under a glass unattended could be removed with it. When at a bar, when a drink is finished it is to be reset on the cocktail napkin to indicate that both can be taken away. At a table, the cocktail napkin and the glass are to be taken away from the place setting position in which it was set.

Caviar Can be Served as a Cocktail Food Professional and Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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Caviar is to be scooped from the container vertically from top to bottom to avoid crushing or mushing the egg and a teaspoonful serve onto your plate.


The following accompaniments can be had in small amounts; using individual spoons: minced onion and sieved egg whites and yolks, as well as a few lemon slices and a couple of toast points. You may then assemble a canapé to your taste with a knife, and then use your fingers to lift it to your mouth. When prepared caviar canapés are passed on trays, simply lift one off the plate; bring it to your plate in mock form, and then pop it into your mouth. During the course of the evening you can take up to two ounces, but no matter how delectable, not another mouthful. There is a reason for the universal rule for eating in company, "Eat a little something before leaving home." And wash your hands before coming to or staying at the table.

Eating Dessert Professional and Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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Dessert can be the (fifth or) last course. It is to be served at all meals when company is in attendance. Dessert can be served in a saucer champagne glass or in a bowl set atop an underlying (B&B) plate. It may be served on a salad plate. A dessert plate, empty or filled, can be passed to each person at a table and set center the place setting. Sauce for a dessert is to be served in a sauce boat and stand and ladled onto it. Sauce can be pre-ladled onto a dessert. The dessert course can be eaten using a fork and spoon, a fork or spoon alone, or with the fingers alone.
1. A fork and spoon can be used together for a dessert course. The spoon takes the place of and is to be used as a knife. The fork is used tines down to hold the item in place while it is being cut. The fork can be used as a pusher to push-pull an item onto a spoon. The spoon is to be used to eat the item. In the Continental style the left hand is kept above the table
2. When a fork or spoon is used alone each is to be held in the right hand tines or bowl up. A fork alone is to be used to cut and eat cake that is frosted.
3. Fingers can be used to eat unfrosted cake; the thumb, index, and the middle fingers may be used to break off a piece of cake and to take it to your mouth
4. In the United States of America eating style, when eating dessert, the rest position for the fork is tines up to the left side of the plate; handle pointed to the edge of the table. The rest position for the spoon is to the right side of the plate; handle pointed in the same direction.
5. The finished position for the fork is tines up to the right side of the plate handle pointed to four o'clock. It can be placed handle pointed toward the edge of the table. The finished position for the spoon is the right side of the fork parallel to it.
6. In the Continental eating style when eating dessert, the rest position for the spoon is center the plate bowl up handle pointed to four o'clock. The rest position for the fork is tines down over the bowl of the spoon; handle to the left pointed to eight o'clock.
7. When the spoon and fork are used together, the finished position for the fork is tines down handle pointed to four o'clock. It can be placed handle toward the edge of the table. The spoon is placed bowl up to the right side of the fork and parallel to it.

Drinks with Dessert

Champagne can be served as a dessert wine. Sparkling water, or cider, may be served in lieu of it. Coffee may be served with dessert or after it. It can be omitted.

Station Eight The Line to Good-bye Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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The line to "Good-bye" leads to acknowledgment. It is used by each guest to say goodbye to the host and hostess. A guest can say, "Thank you for inviting me," or "Thank you for a wonderful evening." Make it so that your host or hostess is able to say, “I am so glad you came.” Avoid having to hear one say, “I am so very glad you came.” It is not the same thing. The line to goodbye can be started by any person who has just received his or her glass of grapefruit juice, prune juice, or water. Each is a universal item served to indicate, "It is time to go now." Know a good time to leave when you drink one. The event is over
1. Right after the "Grapefruit juice, Prune juice, and Water Course."
2. It is over, whenever the host or hostess gives a signal that says so. In a private home, the host or hostess may yawn.
3. An event with entertainment is over whenever the orchestra or Disc Jockey plays any musical selection that contains the words, "Good night sweetheart," or “It is time to go now." Leave a maximum of forty-five minutes after the time stated on the invitation or forty-five minutes after dessert. Allow a maximum of four hours to any night event. For almost three hours will do
4. In official life, the guest of honor must leave before others are free to do so.
5. In social life, company must leave before a guest of honor is free also.
6. Remember to take all of your belongings with you, including your party favor.

Get the Menu Card signed. List the names of people you have met and to who are owed a note saying, “Thank you.” O.K. now is the time to enjoy that signature candy that was placed in that dish or added to your place setting.  Breathe and revel in your new beginnings. “Education and sophistication are the air in which you rise.” The pump is a dinner table.  You know your ascension has begun when someone says to you more than once, “Let’s do lunch.”

An Etiquette Education Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

"Seek knowledge. Go to college. Stay there until you are through. If they can make penicillin out of mold, that's true," they will make a passport for you to be you. A's are pretty to see. C's equal a degree. A degree is a social passport. It can allow you entry into new country. Your transcript may be your ticket. It could determine where you get to sit. Add a course in etiquette; it might be a key to access: how you fit, what you get to see, and how long you get to stay.
Education without sophistication leads to isolation. There is a social requirement to academic refinement. Get your degree. It is required for long-term stability in an upwardly mobile society. It provides a socially acceptable reason to hang out away from home. It can have little to do with the job that you do. Know your education level. For the rest of your life someone will pay you by it and ask it of you.
Have a major. It can be that your major will support you. It may just be your passport. Your major will allow someone to give you credit, or worse to give you a loan. It can be used to let you take a test for a job, and/or to pay you more for the time you trade for money. "To get a good job, get a good education, (in fields which are hiring.)" Get the certification. Few people will ask you about your GPA or your degree, after you do.
You may have many degrees, as long as one is not a doctorate. Avoid getting a PhD unless your major is a "Hard" science, (here a Masters is the Bobbie prize,) or unless you are willing to be self-employed, to teach, and/or to live off grants or insurance money, and then only if you are lucky.
When you get older, go back and get it. It is a nice passport. It is nice to have someone call you doctor. Pick up a class in etiquette. A doctorate without etiquette is an awkward fit, is inadequate. Even you would not want to be around you - if you knew. And now you do. No fear. Add a course (more than a one hour class) in etiquette. Poise is going to look good on you.
In business, you will learn that a degree is only a license to allow someone to let you do what you were already good enough to do, pay you for it, promote you, and to maintain limited liability. An advanced degree is a license to allow you to be a full director in your field, even when the two are non-related. Even from this you will retire.
Have a minor. It is your minor that will give you your freedom. Place in it your passion, your work, and your research. Remember what it was that was important to you, shared with you, and taught to you. While you are busy making money, practice doing the thing(s) that will make you free. If and when your minor gets to be your major you have captured the brass ring.
Follow the work of your minor. Then teach it. Those who can teach do. It is an obligation. Those who cannot teach, teach teachers. What does it matter as long as the word gets out? When you do get to the table, it will be as an equal.
You can not inherit or bequeath a degree. You can get one or to the same place and do the same thing with a good work summary in a field you have pioneered or explored intently and extensively. It takes a lot longer.
Get your degree. You can start with CLEP tests, and with life experience credits. How long can you stay dumb or without one? Until you learn and pass tests. Then who can take knowledge (or your degree) from you? Remember this about education, it is a social passport, even when you are just going home. Etiquette is the rules for the role: skills you need and how to dress for the trip.

When to Get Up Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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In a dining room, place your napkin in your chair and get up at the lead of the senior person. Get up
1. In social life, whenever a senior person, visitor, or a woman visits your table. Remain standing as long as a senior person does, or until you are specifically asked to do otherwise. Stand as long as any woman near is standing (even when asked to do otherwise.)
2. In business, a senior woman may say, “This is business, you can sit. (Do it.”) Remain standing as long as any man or peer who is talking remains standing.
3. To answer any woman who is standing who addresses a remark. Stand the entire time anyone in your party is engaged in conversation with a woman at your table, no matter how long. You can even eat standing. You may omit standing, when a woman who is working in public comes to your table unless she is also a close friend.
4. To be introduced; a woman is to stand for introductions to people senior by position, considerably older, important state officials, and/or their wives, and for clergymen.
5. Get up when someone says "Get up; we need to take a five to ten-minute break." What is being done while you are away is called “Correcting the table.”
Before temporarily leaving the table place flatware in the rest (or finished) position for the style in which you are eating; get up from the right, where practical; place your napkin in your chair. Return to your seat from the left, when returning to sit down.
6. Get up or rise halfway, when a woman gets up to leave your table, to acknowledge her departure; you can omit getting up with a woman at table is also a peer, all other women, as a rule, will forgive you. And get up.
7. At the conclusion of a meeting.
__________
 If you have to leave the table to take care of a personal item: telephone, text, or to handle something on your own, leave the table between courses, if possible.
Place your napkin in your chair. Say, “Excuse me.”



Station Six – The Line to the Bathroom Professional & University Etiquette Business Dining

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The line to the bathroom is to be used to lead people to the best looking bathroom in the house by the most direct route. A bathroom can be used before one comes to the table. It may be used after ordering a drink at any place serving as a bar.
 The trip can begin with the statement, “I’II be right back,” or with the question, “Where can I wash my hands,” after reading any reusable menu. Expect a visit to station six: the bathroom.  At a banquet, during the intermission, this is where you can take that five to ten-minute break. It could be used to allow each person to make repairs to body, mind, and/or make up, to check nails, and to mark cards. In a private home, upon entering the bathroom
1. Lock the door. If you are modest, (or well bred,) you can turn on the water.
2. While inside, strive to eliminate any odor not considered desirable. You can light a single sulfur match (if anyone still has them.) Blow it out. Hold it until the smoke dissipates and then deposit it in an ashtray or in the toilet and flush. You may search for and use an air freshener to spray the water in a short burst. (Yes, it works.) I hide it at the back of the toilet. Spray the water and then under the seat. You could spray it with a breath spray, or add a drop or two of cologne or a few drops of liquid soap. Then flush again. The room will smell better. You might then spray the air. Hands are to be washed each time after finishing in the bathroom. Turn on the faucet at least once while in the bathroom. Wet the soap, if only to make someone believe that before leaving you really did wash your hands and that you do deserve to eat off of china plates. It is easier just to really do it.
1. Wash your hands with cold water and soap. (It releases the grease and the soap.)


2. Turn off the water. You can wipe out the sink using toweling or toilet tissue: watch the shine! Place trash in a receptacle, and leave the bathroom ready to receive the next person. Bless you.

Vegetable Items in Formal Service Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining

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In formal service, two vegetable items are to be served with the main course. A knife and fork can be used to eat vegetables in the Continental style. A vegetable item may be eaten by being incorporated onto a fork with a meat item prior to it being taken to the mouth. 
An artichoke served as a side dish is to be eaten with the fingers.
1. The leaves are pulled off one at a time and dipped in butter before the meat at the tip of the leaf is pulled through your teeth. Avoid trying to eat the whole leaf.
2. A knife is to be used to scrape off the fuzzy part of the heart. The rest of it can be cut and eaten with a knife and fork.
Asparagus tips served as a side dish without a sauce can be eaten by picking a spear up with your fingers and taking it to your mouth. Asparagus served with a sauce, is to be eaten with a knife and a fork. You can cut off each tip with a fork and take it to your mouth. Then the shortened stalk could be picked up with your fingers. However, if you do this at a restaurant or dinner party, it may make you go from being a guest to being entertainment. Some people may not want to eat asparagus in public. For some, it has a side effect. It can make their urine odoriferous within thirty minutes.