Friday, September 14, 2018

Rate Sheet Be at Ease School of Etiquette ATX Young Professional and University Senior Etiquette Lessons

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Harold Almon University Living Skills
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Group Living Skills and Etiquette Lessons Packages
# 40 Minute Lessons $ Per Person/Per Group/ Max Investment  - 1 K
 4   $     8.00   $ 32   Young Professional and University Senior rate
 2  $    16.00  $ 32  Community Resident rate     
Ongoing Group Lessons Unlimited for 4 Weeks $129 or *Free with New Student Special

Young Professionals and University Senior Individual Living Skills and  Etiquette Lessons Packages
# 40 Minute Lessons $ Per Hour/Per Person  
2  $ 25.00      $ 50.00      *New Student Special Ongoing Group Lessons Unlimited for 4 Weeks *1 Free Shopping Tour  Plus  Individual 4 40 Minute Lessons  $ 200.00       

Community Resident Non-Student Individual Living Skills and Etiquette Lessons Packages 
# 40 Minute Lessons $ Per Hour/Per Person 
2  $50.00      $ 100.00   New Student Special On going Group Lessons for 4 Weeks *1 Free Shopping Tour Plus Individual 2 40  Minute Lessons $400.00       

Shopping Tours
1 40 Minute Shopping Tour    $ 25 per person or couple
4 Shopping Tours in 4 Weeks $ 50
*1 Shopping Tour Free with New Student Special  


Rate Sheet Be at Ease School of Etiquette

Look Educated Best Eating in Style Free 40 Minute Lessons Business Dining Etiquette Hacks and Classes for Young Professionals and University Seniors Outclass the Competition RSVP 512 821-2699 University Dining Club The Coach is In


Thursday, September 13, 2018

Ask for a Food Item for Here Business Dining Etiquette 101 University Etiquette

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If you get something to eat, in a star coffee shop, ask for a food item "for here." You will get your item on a ceramic plate. The view you provide for someone else is worth the tax- if any. Each plate may now justify you putting a tip in that jar in clear view. For this, you could carry cash. At some places, tips cannot be added to tabs.
Short of using a ceramic plate, in the Continental style, food has been seen eaten from atop a bag; it serving as a plate.
In the America style, food has been seen being eaten from inside a bag; it is a café habit without the same grace.



Monday, September 3, 2018

Eat a Complete Protein Non Meat

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"A complete protein or whole protein is a food source of protein that contains an adequate proportion of each of the nine essential amino acids necessary in the human diet," that the body cannot make.

Eat Grain as a Complete Protein
CROW Corn Rice Oats Wheat
Corn and  Legumes
Cornbread and Lentils
Corn and Legumes
Corn and Lima Beans
Corn and Legumes
Corn Black Bean Salad
Corn and Legumes
Grits and Peanut Butter
Corn and Nuts
Tinned Corn and Nuts Recipes
Corn and Seeds
Tinned Corn and Seeds
Rice and Legumes
Rice and Pinto Beans
Rice and Legumes
Rice and Black Eyed Peas
Rice and Legumes
Rice and Peanut Butter
Rice and Legumes
Rice and Green Peas
Rice and Nuts
Rice and Nut Recipes
Rice and Seeds
Rice and Seeds Recipes
Oats and Legumes
Oatmeal and Peanut Butter
Oatmeal and P B Cookies
Oats and Nuts
Oat and Nuts Recipes
Oats and Seeds
Oat and Seeds Recipes
Bread and Peanut Butter
Wheat & Legumes

Wheat & Legumes
Crackers and Peanut Butter
Wheat & Legumes
Pasta and Pinto Beans
Wheat & Legumes
Ramen & Beans

Wheat & Legumes
Cous Cous and Beans
Wheat & Legumes
Ramen & Peanut Butter
Wheat and Nuts
Wheat and Nuts Recipes
Wheat and Seeds
Wheat and Seeds Recipes

 



Eat a Pulse as a Complete Protein 
A Pulse: an edible seed that grows in a pod - tinned pulses
Legume and Grain Peanut butter & bread
Legume and Grain Peanut Butter & Corn on  off the Cob
Legume and Grain Peanut Butter & Crackers
Legume and Grain Green Bean Almandine 
Legume and Mixed Nuts Peanuts and Mixed Nuts
Legume and Nuts  Ramen and Nuts 
Legume and Seeds  Chic Peas and Sesame Seeds - Hummus
Eat a Nut and Seed as a Complete Protein 
Nut and Seed and Corn Nuts and Seeds and Corn Recipes
Nuts & Seeds Rice Nuts and Seeds and Rice Recipes
Nuts & Seeds & Oats Nuts and Seeds and Oats Recipes
Nuts & Seeds & Wheat Nuts and Seeds and Wheat Recipes


Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Provide or Exchange Contact Information Business Dining Etiquette 101 University Etiquette (32)

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Plan on how to provide or exchange contact information. Wait until it or a card is offered by the senior person. Always accept contact information; a way to say thanks.
In a cross cultural environment, have bi-lingual cards. Give these cards with two hands, host language side up.
You can use a wireless application to exchange contact information. Before you give contact information update your email address and website address. Ensure each is appropriate for the recipient.
You can decide to be prepared with more than having cards. You could send an email to your phone which has your contact information, and an attached updated profile, or bio-benefit resume ready to forward for the asking.
You could exchange contact information by having the person use your telephone to call their telephone, and then establish you as a contact. Next establish that person as a contact. 
You could get a number, call, and then establish that person as a contact.  Go to “Recents” and mark the event under “Notes” the same as you would mark the back of a card. This is the new old school.

Name Table Glassware Business Dining Etiquette 101 University Etiquette Outclass the Competition (65)

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Know the name of table glassware: left to right Water, Red wine, White wine, Sherry, and Champagne. (This fluted glass is to be set above the others.)  Each glass is to be placed according to the size of the plate and order of the course to be used with it. A glass for Sherry can be omitted. No more than four glasses of any kind are to be in any one place setting at any one time. When eating in company water is to be present as a sign of hospitality. Another glass may be set in place for what you serve as wine. There is to be a two glass minimum. Informally these glasses could be the same size. Glasses stay on the table until each guest has left the room.


A Napkin is Not to End On a Plate Business Dining Etiquette 101 University Etiquette

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A napkin is to be used to signal when eating is to begin. It is to be picked up at the lead of the hostess or senior person at the table. This is the indicator that others at table are to do so. Even at a dinner for two.
1. When seated at a table, a napkin is to be picked up and placed or replaced under the table onto your lap fold side towards you, prior to eating or drinking anything. It can be placed on your lap quartered for breakfast and for Continental or fast food, or in a three quarter fold the long way for dinner.
2. One corner of the napkin is to be used to correct conditions at table disturbed by the act of eating. Gently rub the tips of your fingers against the corner of one to remove foodstuffs collected during the course of eating. This corner could be folded under before using it again.
3.  One corner of the napkin can be used to blot (touch) the mouth gently prior to taking a sip (pour) of any beverage. The courtesy of napkin use is asked: to keep your grease off the glass, and to give your food time to pass.
4. A napkin is to remain on your lap as long as you continue to eat or to drink at a table. When standing or leaving a table temporarily, your napkin is to be placed on your chair. Some like to place it atop a book.
5. At the end of a meal, at the lead of the hostess or the senior person, the napkin is to be placed in a mock fold to the left (leaving side) of your place setting. The rule: a napkin is not supposed to end on a plate. A napkin is to look within reason as it did at the beginning even when it is made of paper. The person closest to doing this wins this napkin game, and may graduate to getting and using a fabric one. Either way, you are only to get one napkin. The secret is to use only one corner. 

Sunday, November 5, 2017

Handling Your Glass Business Dining Etiquette 101 University Etiquette

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When standing, hold and rest a glass by the base or the stem on the left palm, held by the thumb base and the ring and pinky fingers.  When not drinking, keep your right hand warm, dry, and free. The first feel of your right hand is not to be a cold one.  When a sip is desired, lift the glass by the base or the stem with three fingers: thumb, and index and middle fingers, with the right hand.   It can be lifted by the bowl, when it contains brandy, just because. The drinking of a beverage is to be done with the right hand, not your full hand.   While taking a drink from a glass, the elbow is to be down by your side and moved forward, and from wrist to hand moved upward, and a pour of the beverage is to be taken into the mouth from the edge of the glass.  Do this silently.  Avoid top holding a glass.  Avoid the crane; drink without poking someone in the eye.   The cocktail straw provided with a drink is called a stirrer. It is to be used as such: only for stirring.  It is to be used, and then it is to be discarded. It can be removed and held under the glass.  It could be placed on a napkin on a bar. It is hard to “Mac” (look cool) sipping a drink from a stirrer. Above a certain level, you will be the only person in the room doing this. While drinking, you can avoid slurping or guzzling by closing your upper lip between any liquid and the edge of any glass, and then pouring the liquid into your mouth. You may avoid chewing a beverage by simply swallowing small amounts of it. Leave a little of each beverage in each glass. The number of pre-dinner drinks to have is two; one drink helps make for good conversation with you. More than two drinks makes for great conversation for someone else about you. All pre-dinner drinks can be “Virgin: non-alcoholic” Have one. The finished glass is to be rested on a bar, or tray, atop a cocktail napkin. 

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Rules for Name Badge Placement Business Dining 101 University Etiquette Outclass the Competition

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Get a name badge holder with a clip, pin, or magnet; not crazy about cords.  You may get two, each in a different size.  Place any stic back name badge atop and around a business card and place this inside your name badge holder. Get and wear a name badge. The number one accessory in Business Networking can be a name badge.  It can say, "Hello," "Let's talk," or "Let's do business."
Know where to place that name badge: theirs, single-line up high to the right (to show courtesy).  A badge, when it also has your company name goes high to the left, (to show allegiance,) above the right pocket (to show authority,) at the chest (to show security,) or at the belt (to show a pass ;) there are limits to how low one could have to go to learn your name. A badge with your name and the name or your company goes to the left when you are a host, allegiance is owed. Who knew? I do and I am not alone. Note the Family Feud name badge placement. You can check your name badge placement in a mirror. Adjust it until you get a picture perfect match.

Friday, September 1, 2017

Job Interview Dining Etiquette Things to Avoid While Eating Business Dining Etiquette 101 University Etiquette Outclass the Competition

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While eating in company, there are things you want to avoid. Here are some of them.
1. In cocktail service, avoid using a napkin to wrap around your glass or drinking from a stirrer.
2. At table, avoid picking up your napkin until the senior person does so, or touching your food until you receive a signal to dig in.
3. During the meal, avoid wrapping your arm around your plate, eating with your elbows on the table, talking with your mouth too full, slurping, being picky, placing a whole spoon bowl in your mouth, leaving your spoon in your soup bowl or cup when the course is finished, pouring sauce from a sauce boat, using a knife as you would use a saw, placing the knife and fork like a pair of oars, looking like a duck: leaning over your plate each time you take in food, smacking your lips, ignoring your meal partners, wiping your mouth with a napkin in one hand, while holding a spoon, knife, or fork in the other, gesticulating with a fork or knife.
Avoid taking your time, sharing meals" in business, " or asking to, eating everything on your plate, not knowing the company song, not dancing, asking to take any food home with you, placing the napkin on your plate, or in your glass, stacking plates or handing them to any serving staff, pushing a plate away from you (when you are finished,) leaning back in your chair, chewing gum anytime, leaving the table before you are excused, staying in the room when someone says, "We need to take a five to ten minute break," and
4. Taking this all too seriously. (Trust me.)

Saying Thank You Business Dining Etiquette University Etiquette

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The first half of saying “Thank You” is acknowledgment. It is done in two parts (attendance: meeting expectations and verbal acknowledgment. Part a.: physical attendance: you have shown up and have meet expectations.
Part b.: say a verbal thank you: for every event you attend where you did not have to work or pay to attend there is to be aa verbal acknowledgment, say thank you to the host or hostess in person.
You can say, "Thank you for inviting me", or "Thank you for a wonderful evening." Make it so that your host or hostess is able to say, "I am so glad that you came."
You are still here: no one has said “I am so “very” glad you came. Hearing, “I am so “very” glad that you came,” is not the same thing.
In a commercial environment, when you receive food raw, well done, brunt, stale, old, or salted like a pretzel, you can save a piece (and take a picture) in case you want to tell someone later.
When not at a business dinner, you can send a portion back to be packed “To go” so you can do something with it later: have it to make a stew for the host, or a gift for the health department.
There is more than one way to say, “Thank you so very much, for having me.”