Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Men's Personal Grooming University Etiquette Men's Business Grooming Etiquette to Know Professional and Graduate University Etiquette Men's Grooming Male Care Matters Things Expected from the Male Half

Men's Personal Grooming and
Men's Business Etiquette to Know
Professional and Graduate
University Etiquette
Men's Business Body Grooming

An At Ease Press Etiquette Guide
A Be at Ease School of Etiquette Course Guide

(74)

Text by
Harold Almon

Published by
At Ease Press baesoe.com

All rights reserved including the right to reproduce this book, or parts thereof, in any form, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review.

ISBN 978-0-917921-44-5
Copyright (c) 2016
Harold Almon

Printed in the United States of America

Acknowledgment


To Josh, and to each student/son who wanted to know what could be expected from him publicly, my humble attempt at a map.

To Proofreaders and reviewers;
Thank you for inserting arrows where needed, dotting "i" s, where required, and adding directions and signs to assist sons in climbing mountains, standing on their own, and finding their way home.

Men's Personal Grooming and Men's Business Etiquette  to Know is a compilation of three life skills etiquette guides on male development: Male Personal Grooming, University Etiquette Sex, and Men's Business Etiquette to Know:  things (a male needs) to do, things of which to be mindful, and cool rules to know; things someone will tell a graduate student son.

“Do not hate the player or the game. Hate (having the talent, and) not knowing the rules.”

Link “Manners to Etiquette” – outclass the competition. Manners: things you know to do, must be married to etiquette: the rules to go with them, for there to be a good result; what you approve of must be married with the set of rules for the court you are in or for the court at the level to which you wish to ascend. He who has talent and follows the rules best wins.

Eti - Q Test Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette University Etiquette Business Dining Things to Learn and Do

What they say, "Everyone eats this way."  Ok then,  link manners to etiquette, outclass the competition. Two pre-steps: RSVP    Accept the ‘kind’ invitation, and   identify meal restrictions.   Note the dress request.  In addition to the universal rule for eating in company, "_(Eat Something)  after you leave home.” Get coupons and get directions. Because the more you climb the corporate ladder the more dining protocols matter; there comes a time to transcend coffee shop habits and dining hall ways, and to display rules of etiquette for business dining. It is a ritual at which more than eating is done. On the way to the top there are stations and lines at which to stop.
Station 1. The Meeting Line 1.       Be punctual, __________ whatever this means in your community.      (Occasionally show up _________.)
Station 2. Name Badge Placement
2. Know where to wear that name badge__________________. Get a name badge holder.
Station 3. Something to Drink
3.       Know how to respond to an offer of an alcoholic drink. During daylight, order a___________ over a “Non-Alcoholic one.” It is just easier to say. A juice can be a substitute for an alcoholic drink. Know “What can I get you,” and what it will cost.   Know what to do with that cocktail napkin______________. 
4.     Learn to hold a glass by ________.  Lift the glass with the ____________. 
 Avoid the crane; drink without poking someone in the eye; keep your elbows and arms down close to your sides while taking a drink from a glass. When not drinking, keep your ________ warm, dry, and free. Appear to be drinking less than the host, hostess, or person who is picking up the tap. At an evening event, make any drink Virgin (especially after your first.) (And ______________ before you come to or stay at the table.) 
5 .       Learn to survive a business party: hold a napkin, glass, and plate in ________hand functionally.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Dining Etiquette Eating Lobster Business Dinner Etiquette Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Dining 102




Outclass the Competition
by Harold Almon baesoe.com
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
Lobster served as a main course is to be eaten with a plate, the
fingers, an oyster cocktail fork, and a bib for each person to be provided one.


2. The meat in the pocket of the body is to be extracted using an oyster cocktail fork.

3. It can be cut, dipped in a sauce and then placed in the mouth. The lobster  (green) or the roe (red) is to be lifted out of the body and placed to the left side of the plate. The roe (red) can be eaten.
4. The lobster tail is to be held in the left hand and detached from the body held firmly in the right hand. The meat is to be removed by breaking off the little flaps at the small end and then inserting the oyster cocktail fork in this end and pushing the meat out of the large end.

5. The tail can be split prior to the time it is brought to the table. Then the meat is to be lifted out of the shell in one piece using a fork. In either case, the meat can be cut into manageable portions one or two pieces at a time.
Each piece of lobster may be dipped in the attending sauce and then placed in the mouth.

Note: Again, some people cannot or will not eat Lobster.



Dining Etiquette An Appetizer Business Dinner Etiquette Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining 101


Outclass the Competition
By Harold Almon baesoe.com
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin


An appetizer is essentially a hors d’oeouvre that could be served at the table usually in lieu of or prior to a first course. An amuse bouche is a bite size appetizer that might be provided by a chef at no cost to a patron. It might be paired with a wine. It cannot be ordered from a menu.

Shrimp, oysters, clams, or escargot can be served as an appetizer. The vessel for each can be set atop a show plate. The oyster cocktail fork is placed to the extreme right of the last knife or spoon. It can be placed in the bowl of the soup spoon tines-up, with the handle pointed to five o'clock. An oyster cocktail fork may be placed to the extreme left of the last fork(s.) It could be placed with up to three other forks in a place setting. It is the lone exception to the rule, "only three items of any one kind in a place setting at a time. It can be placed to the right side of an underlying plate when a dish is served to a table. This is also the finished position for the fork.

An Appetizer Business Dinner Etiquette Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining 101

1. Shrimp is to be impaled onto this fork, dipped into the cocktail sauce and then placed into the mouth. Shrimp that is very large may be bitten off in a manageable bite and then re-dipped into the cocktail sauce.

2. Each oyster is to be served in a half shell. Lemon, if provided, may be squeezed onto it. The oyster is to be detached and lifted from the shell with a cocktail fork before being eaten. It can be chewed.

Informally an oyster can be dipped into a cocktail sauce and then eaten. Oyster crackers may be provided and eaten by being dropped in the cocktail sauce and taken to the mouth with the cocktail fork. Avoid squeezing lemon into the cocktail sauce.

3. Clams are to be eaten whole.

4. Escargot (snail) is to be eaten by holding the shell in the left hand and digging out the body with the use of an oyster cocktail fork held in the right hand and placing it in the mouth whole. Avoid lifting any shell and drinking the juice or butter within when you are at any table set with a real tablecloth.

Note: in a private home, a hinged snail shell holder is to be omitted. The shell can be held with a napkin.

Note: there are other appetizer options; some religions disallow practitioners to have any of the above foods. The only appetizers for a guest are those that can be eaten by each person being entertained.

Note: In an everyday world the appetizer could be Chips and Salsa and or Queso; avoid double dipping the chip.

The appetizer course can be omitted. Enjoy that pre-dinner drink.

Waterat Table University Business Etiquette Dinner Tonight Professional & Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining 101

Outclass the Competition
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512-821-2699

Avoid making the OK sign in public at any time.

Avoid adding a straw or lid to any glass “For here.”

Remember the sign; beverages are to be taken up from the right side using the right hand.



Water at Table

When a guest is to be at table a water glass is to be set at each setting. The water glass is to be set to the right of the plate space above the tip of the knife. Yes, this is your glass.

When a cold beverage is to be served in addition to water, a water glass can be used for it or a glass specifically named for the beverage to be served may be added to the table. When under a roof “Water for here” is to be served in a glass.

In a private home, each water goblet is to be filled ¾ full prior to the time people come to the table.

In a commercial dining room, water is to be served, after people are seated, from the right.

In informal service, it can be provided when requested and given in a ceramic glass or a cup. Avoid asking for and or using a lid or a straw. At some point, omit the sippy cup and risk that the drink might not tip.

Before taking a drink of any beverage eating implements are to be placed in the rest position for the style in which you are eating. Pat or blot your mouth with the corner of your napkin and return it to your lap.

A water glass is to be picked up by the stem with the right hand, and with elbow down and in, taken to the mouth, and a sip (pour) of water is to be taken.

The rest and finished position for the glass is in the table setting position. At a table, avoid placing a napkin under a water glass.

In a private home, the water glass can be refilled at the table, by a server, or guests from a pitcher on the table, or the hostess can offer it from a pitcher on a sideboard.

In a commercial dining room, the water glass can be refilled by a server without being lifted from the table, but usually not more than twice.

A Pre dinner Drink Outclass the Competition by Harold Almon Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin 512-821-2699

Outclass the Competition
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512-821-2699

A pre-dinner drink can be omitted at a bar and offered at a table. It is called an aperitif: (an appetite starter.) It is to be placed to the right of all other glasses. In a commercial dining room, a pre-dinner drink is to be placed atop a cocktail napkin when it is served, rested, or finished. It and the napkin can be removed after it is finished.



A guest may be heard to say, “Please order me a drink. I’II be right back,” or “Where can I wash my hands.” A guest could wait to do this until after reading or ordering from a reusable menu. Once someone does this, expect the next act: a visit to the bathroom; it is station six.

Which Drinks Mine

It is my wish to assist you in locating the drink which is yours and knowing which drink is mine.

1. “With each hand make an OK sign.
2. Place each hand on the table.
3. Left to right –“Where you see the “b” is the side for your
bread. Where you see “d” is the side for your drink.”
4. “Better yet left to right: bread left, drink right, solids left,
liquids right, foods served left, drinks served right. Now
about your BMW: (Bread, Meat, and Water, (or Wine,)” to this conversation say, "Good night."
5. That drink to your right is yours. This one is mine.

Job Interview Dining Etiquette Outclass the Competition Ask Me About Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette - Harold Almon Young Professionals Wednesday Free Etiquette Lesson 5 PM or 6 PM

Job Interview Dining Etiquette sk Me Anytihing About Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette - Harold Almon Young Professionals Tuesday or Saturday Free Etiquette Lesson 5 PM or 6 PM
Outclass the Competition
by Harold Almon
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512 821-2699


Ask Me About
Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette
Outclass the Competition

Graduate Student Professional & University Dining Etiquette 101
40 Minute Lessons
Daily          7:00 AM  or 11:00 AM
Sat              10:00 AM  or   6:00 PM
Nightly       6:00 PM
*Tue       6:00 PM

Men's Personal Grooming and Men's Business Etiquette to Know
Men's Business Dress Etiquette Lessons        
Sat 12:00 PM  2:00 PM

Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on) Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette. A Napkin is Not to End on a Plate *Young Professionals Wednesday 6:00 PM. Meal and Gratuity Optional.  Eventbrite: Be at Ease School of Etiquette

Harold Almon 512-821-2699




Saturday, May 20, 2017

Three course dinner

Plan on a three-course dinner: a first course, main course, and a dessert. At a social meal, you can offer to share a dessert. At a business social meal, omit doing this.
Review the menu at each place to which you will take someone. And if you wish, know the signature dish not to be missed. If you are invited to share a meal with someone, eat a little something before you leave home.
Where allowed and appropriate, to each dessert you can add or have added cookies bought during a fund raiser such as chocolate cookies with pink M & Ms in them made and purchased in support of the cure for breast cancer (Thanks Melissa.)
You may add a few chocolate covered mint cookies, or chocolate stripped coconut cookies, acquired in support of a Scout or as part of Giving Back.
A trend has developed of omitting the first and second course. Most meals consist of a fourth and a third course: a salad and a main course. The latter practice is seen often in commercial dining rooms. There a dessert is seen and had only by the very lucky.
If you are going to share a meal with someone, eat in courses over eating in piles. At minimum, plan on a two-part lunch: a first course and a main course, or a main course and a dessert. It takes a little extra time, allows for longer conversation, and builds in great memories.

Ah yes, and learn the most favorable parking instructions. See if the parking pass for your guest can be validated by the restaurant. The discount for the special of the day can be overshadowed by the cost of the valet.

Job Interview Dining Etiquette USA Menu – Number of Courses Professional and Graduate University Etiquette Business Dining



Outclass the Competition
by Harold Almon
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

baesoe.com

The standard United States of America menu, no matter how formal, consists of no more than five (four) courses. You can check with the White House. Practice eating in courses over eating in piles.
1. The first course could be an appetizer. It might precede or substitute as a first course. As a rule the first course is to be soup. It can be fruit-juice or melon. The first course can be omitted. Avoid serving rolls or sliced bread and butter or Olive oil as an intended first course.
2. The second course can be a fish, with maybe a potato item, or at lunch, it may be an egg dish. This course could be omitted.
3. The third or main course (sometimes called the entrée in restaurants) is to be a roasted meat (a Roti,) a fowl, or a vegetable item, and two vegetable side items, (or informally one side item may be a starch item.) At least one non-meat main course item is to be included in each menu offered.
4. The fourth course might be a green salad with cheese. * Salad served before a main course stems from what I call a Mickey D’s mentality: greet guest within 30 seconds, give each something to drink within three minutes, and something to eat within seven.
C’est tres gourmet - not really. The drink before you eat is an aperitif and something to eat before a main course can be a consommé. The purpose of a salad is to push the main course away. This course may be served in lieu of a third course. It may be omitted in favor of dessert.
5. The fifth or last course is to be dessert. Coffee can be served with dessert, after it, or omitted entirely.

What is served in each course may change with personal preference and pallet of each Chef. In the United States of America this is the main course frame.