Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Advanced Dining Etiquette Free Business Dinner Etiquette Lab Tue An Etiquette Education


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 512-821-2699

An Etiquette Education

"Seek knowledge. Go to college. Stay there until you are through. If they can make penicillin out of mold, that's true," they will make a passport for you to be you. A's are pretty to see. C's equal a degree. A degree is a social passport. It can allow you entry into new country. Your transcript may be your ticket. It could determine where you get to sit. Add a course in etiquette; it might be a key to access: how you fit, what you get to see, and how long you get to stay.

Education without sophistication leads to isolation. There is a social requirement to academic refinement. Get your degree. It is required for long-term stability in an upwardly mobile society. It provides a socially acceptable reason to hang out away from home. It can have little to do with the job that you do. Know your education level. For the rest of your life someone will pay you by it and ask it of you.

Have a major. It can be that your major will support you. It may just be your passport. Your major will allow someone to give you credit, or worse to give you a loan. It can be used to let you take a test for a job, and/or to pay you more for the time you trade for money. "To get a good job, get a good education, (in fields which are hiring.)" Get the certification. Few people will ask you about your GPA or your degree, after you do.

You may have many degrees, as long as one is not a doctorate. Avoid getting a PhD unless your major is a "Hard" science, (here a Masters is the Bobbie prize,) or unless you are willing to be self-employed, to teach, and/or to live off grants or insurance money, and then only if you are lucky.

When you get older, go back and get it. It is a nice passport. It is nice to have someone call you doctor. Pick up a class in etiquette. A doctorate without etiquette is an awkward fit, is inadequate. Even you would not want to be around you - if you knew. And now you do. No fear. Add a course (more than a one day class) in etiquette. Poise is going to look good on you.

In business, you will learn that a degree is only a license to allow someone to let you do what you were already good enough to do, pay you for it, promote you, and to maintain limited liability. An advanced degree is a license to allow you to be a full director in your field, even when the two are non-related. Even from this you will retire.

Have a minor. It is your minor that will give you your freedom. Place in it your passion, your work, and your research. Remember what it was that was important to you, shared with you, and taught to you. While you are busy making money, practice doing the thing(s) that will make you free. If and when your minor gets to be your major you have captured the brass ring.

Follow the work of your minor. Then teach it. Those who can teach do. It is an obligation. Those who cannot teach, teach teachers. What does it matter as long as the word gets out? When you do get to the table, it will be as an equal.

You can not inherit or bequeath a degree. You can get one or to the same place and do the same thing with a good work summary in a field you have pioneered or explored intently and extensively. It takes a lot longer.

Get your degree. You can start with CLEP tests, and with life experience credits. How long can you stay dumb or without one? Until you learn and pass tests. Then who can take knowledge (or your degree) from you? Remember this about education, it is a social passport, even when you are just going home. Etiquette is the rules for the role: skills you need and how to dress for the trip.

Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 512 821-2699

Advanced Dining Etiquette
Business Dinner Etiquette
for Professionals Parents and University Students
Look As Educated As You Speak When You Eat

9:00 AM - 11:30 AM   **Sun or 
5:00 PM -   7:30 PM     Tue or Fri

Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on) etiquette for business dining, stations and lines, rules for name badge placement, notes on handshaking, something to drink, getting business cards, USA menu number of courses, rules for setting a table, advanced formal place setting, rules for eating Continental Style, How to eat chicken with a knife and fork, rules for saying thank you and more. Two-hour program with 30 minute post-class discussion. 

Advanced Dining Etiquette 
Business Dinner Etiquette (stand alone lab) camp meal and gratuity included.
**Early Bird Class Half Off  BOGO and free lab meal and gratuity not included
Semester Etiquette Lessons - Open schedule - one - four meetings.  Ten hours of etiquette labs plus limited on line and telephone consultations.
Group rates available. Free Etiquette Lab First Tue.  RSVP day of event to confirm time and location 512-821-2699


Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Advanced Dining Etiquette Business Dinner Etiquette The Short Course Harold Almon




Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon baesoe.com


Business Dinner Etiquette
Things to Learn and to Do

Look As Educated As
You Speak When You Eat

Outshine the Competition

1. Learn how to survive a mocktail party: how to hold a napkin, glass, and a plate, in your left hand, functionally.
2. Drink: (without poking someone in the eye;) keep your elbows and arms down close to your sides. Pour liquid into your mouth, from your wrist. Do this silently. Know how to respond to an offer of an alcoholic drink. During daylight, order a “Virgin” drink over a “Non-Alcoholic one.” It is easier to say. Appear to be drinking less than the host, hostess, or person who is picking up the tap. At an evening event, make any drink Virgin (especially after your first.) When not drinking, keep your right hand warm, dry, and free.
3. Mingle. Be good company. Know where to wear that name badge. Do introductions (correctly,) senior then junior or junior to senior. When someone gives you a business card, know what to do with it and what to have to give back.
4. Learn seats of honor: where to stop at a table. At a family dinner, know an invocation acceptable to your host’s culture.
5. Place a napkin in your lap before eating or drinking anything.
6. Maintain your cover: (place setting for one,) or establish one.
7. Look for drinks to be served from the right (refreshing.) Look for glasses in a place setting to be left in place until after you have left the table, (unless it is a pre-dinner drink served on a napkin, or you are doing very formal dining.) Learn what to do after reading that reusable menu.
8. Look for food to be served (counter-clockwise) from the left (leaving.)
9 Take small amounts of food. (Eat in courses over eating in piles.) Avoid taking too little, or too much, or more in visual calories than those dining around you. Try a little of everything unless restricted by religion, health, or culture.
10. Avoid leaving teeth marks in bread that you are eating. Avoid bread until you receive an entrée; remember bread is not a first course.
11. Eat each meal in an accepted style. Know which fork to use and when and how. Cut items in only one direction, one or two pieces at a time. (Yes, you may eat only one thing at a time.) Avoid eating too little, too much, or too fast, or acting as if the meal is to be your last. Make as little noise as possible.
12. When at a loss as to how to eat a particular dish, watch the person who made or ordered it. You can ask, "How am I to eat this?" The lesson most likely will begin with a smile.
13. Avoid adding salt or pepper to food, unless it is to radishes, celery, corn, a potato or salad. When salt is requested, ensure both pepper and salt are passed.
14. (Sit up straight. Bring food to you.) Close your mouth around the edge of any fork placed in it. Chew each portion twenty-four times, with your mouth closed, and saver each bite. Taste buds live and digestion begins in the month not the stomach – yes that’s right.
15. Place your implements in the rest position for the style in which you are eating, anytime you want.
16. Take a hand rest often. Rest the heels of your hands on the edge of the table. You can rest your elbows on the table - in between courses. (Continentally, you can talk with a knife and fork in your hands. Keep them low.)
17. Talk, in business, some unseen food can still be in your mouth. Keep the people at your table company. (Remember, for some, your conversation is the entertainment.) Talk about things other than work (unless it is the purpose for the meal). Know what to do when someone stops to visit you at table.
18. Pace yourself. Eat each course in such a manner as to finish it along with the person to your right. In public, leave a little something of each course on your plate, and of each drink in each glass. Leave each course plate in position until it is removed by a waitperson or replaced by the next plate. Look for food to be removed from the right (retrieving.) (Avoid helping: passing your plates, unless asked, even when you use to wait tables. At dinner is not the place to display this trait.)
19. When it is time, “Take a break.” Before temporarily leaving the table place flatware in the rest position for the style in which you are eating; get up; place your napkin in your chair. When its time, sing the company song. When it is time, dance. Let the host pay (and tip) where required.
20. Before permanently leaving a table, place flatware in the finished position for the style in which you are eating.
21. Place your napkin in a mock fold to the left of your place setting, (again napkin to the side.) Avoid putting any napkin on your used plate or in any glass. Avoid staking plates or making plates"trash." Get up and push in your chair until it is six inches away from the edge of the table.
22. Say thank you. Then, say thanks again later by note.
23. Remember reciprocity. Read and research as much as possible the culture in which you will be the host. Watch each act of eating with an open mind, eye, and heart. Practice diligently. While eating in company, there are things to learn and do. – Business Dinner Etiquette, this is the short course.

Sunday, June 8, 2014

Summer Etiquette Lessons Free Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Lab Mon Outshine the Competition 512-821-2699

Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon baesoe.com

Summer Etiquette Lessons "Manners to Etiquette
"
Students Outshine the Competition 
                           9:00 AM - 11:30 AM 
                                  1:00 PM -   3:30  PM
                                  
5:00 PM -   7:30 PM     

Advanced Dining Etiquette
Business Dinner Etiquette
Business and University Etiquette II
Look As Educated As
You Speak When You Eat


(stand alone lab) Camp $75.00
Meal and gratuity included
BOGO*



Business and University Etiquette
Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette *

Look Educated As You Eat  

(stand alone lab) Camp $50.00 
Meal and gratuity included 
Attend again free* all summer

Weekend Etiquette Orientation
Class  $125.00  per student 
Ten hours of etiquette instruction 

Summer Etiquette Lessons 
$250.00  per semester
First Class Free Open schedule
one - four meetings

Ten hours of etiquette labs 
limited on line and 
telephone consultations

Summer - Spring Etiquette Lessons
$500  per school year
Open schedule - two - eight meetings
Twenty hours ++ of etiquette education 
labs plus free expanded on line and telephone consultations
Group rates available.

Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on)

Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette 
Mens Personal Grooming Etiquette Mens Business Dressing Etiquette
Etiquette Using Personal and Business Cards
Business Dinner Etiquette
 
Free casual and fine dining etiquette lab Monday third week of each month for parents and college freshmen. BOGO and *Free etiquette lab expenses and gratuities not included.  Sliding scale rates apply to non-freshmen. Scholarships available. 
 
  
Group rates and open schedule classes available 

Info http://baesoe.com or call Harold Almon 
Summer Etiquette Lessons 512-821-2699 


Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Eti - Q Test Business & University Dining Etiquette II Business Dinner Etiquette Things to Learn and Do Manners to Etiquette Students Outshine the Competition


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon baesoe.com

Business & University Dining Etiquette II Business Dinner Etiquette Eti - Q Test Things to Learn and Do   Manners to Students Etiquette Outshine the Competition
 1. Be punctual, ___________________, whatever this means in your community. (Occasionally show up with a present.) 
2.      Know where to wear that name badge _____________
3.      Shake hands the right way________________
4.     Do introductions (correctly, __________________ then _____________ or_____________. 
5.  Mingle. Be good company. When someone gives you a business card, know what to do with it ____________________________, and what to have to give back. ________________
You can say, “I am temporarily out”   I can email you my resume or contact information.  
6. Know how to respond to an offer of a drink, during daylight. Order _______________. It is easier to say than ________________.                                                                                                          Know “What  can I get you”  And  What it will cost.  What to do with the napkin.  Hold the glass by the base or the stem ___________. Do this _________. When not drinking, _______________________ (And wash your hands before you come to or stay at the table.)
7. Drink without poking someone in the eye; avoid the crane; raising your elbow to take a drink from a glass.    
8. Learn how to survive a business party: how to hold a napkin, glass, and a plate, in your ____________, functionally.                          
9.  Talk. At a family dinner, know an invocation acceptable to your host’s culture.________________________.
10.    Know the current USA menu number and order of courses _________________, __________, __________, __________, __________. Learn what to do after reading that reusable menu______________________.  
11.    Maintain your cover: _____________________, or establish one.  (Sit up straight. _____________________________.)   Take small amounts of food. (Eat in ___________ over eating in piles.)  Pace yourself. Eat each course in such a manner as to finish it__________________________ .                          When at a loss as to how to eat a particular dish____________________________. You can ask ___________________________________?" The lesson most likely will begin with a smile. Chew each portion __________________, with your mouth closed, and saver each bite. Taste buds live and digestion begins __________________ not the stomach – yes that’s right. Make as ____________________ as possible.    Place your implements in ___________________ for the style in which you are eating, knife blade facing____________________________________ anytime you want, and ______________________.
12.    Avoid bread until _______________________; remember bread is not a first course. Avoid leaving _________________ in bread that you are eating.       No more than ___________of water.
13.    Know which fork to use: name six, ____________, ____________, ____________, ____________, ____________, ____________, and how and when.
14.    When seated at a table, place a napkin _____________ before eating or drinking anything.                             
15. Look for food to be served (counter-clockwise) from __________ (leaving.) At a table -- look for drinks at table to be served from ________ (refreshing)
16.    Eat each meal in an accepted style: ______________or ______________________. _______________ in only one direction, one ____________________ at a time. (Yes, you may eat only one thing at a time.)    Keep your hands on the table
Eat each course in such a manner as to finish it______________________. Take __________ often. Rest the __________________ on the edge of the table. You can rest your elbows on the table __________________. (Continentally, you can talk with a knife and fork in your hands.___________. 
17. Avoid adding
salt or pepper to food, unless it is to ________, _________, _________, ___________, or ______________. When salt is requested, ensure _____________________ Avoid ________________.  
18. Know the menu order of courses for the day ______________, __________, __________, __________, __________.      
19.  Before temporarily  leaving a table, place flatware in ____________________ for the style in which you are eating.  Get up; place your napkin ____________.  Know what to do when someone visits your table_______. Between courses, ________________.  Visit Station Six.
20. At table finishes. Before permanently leaving a table, place flatware in ____________________ for the style in which you are eating.    In public, ___________________ of each course on your plate and of each drink in each glass.  Leave each course plate _____________until it is removed by a waitperson or replaced by the next plate. Look for food to be removed from _____________ (retrieving.)
21. Place your napkin in a mock fold to the___________ (leaving) side of your place setting, (again napkin on the side.)   A napkin is to be crisp at the end When its time, sing the company song______________. When it is time, dance. Let the host pay (and tip) where required. OK back to class. 
22.    Remember reciprocity, where required. Read and research as much as possible the culture in which you ___________________.        
Watch each act of eating with an open mind, eye, and heart. Practice diligently. While eating in company, there are things to learn and do. – This is the short course __________For answers read the blog, read the book, or bring this test to class. N/A items are from the next class.

I know you want - Manners in a minute – done – but just some. Math took months, but Manners to Etiquette takes practice that’s the rest of life’s test.
Business & University Dining Eti - Q Test Things to Learn and Do Manners to Etiquette Outshine the Competition


Thursday, May 1, 2014

College & University Dining Etiquette Free Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Lab for College Freshmen School of Etiquette in Austin Harold Almon

Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 512 821-2699

Manners to Etiquette
Students Outshine the Competition

College & University Dining Etiquette
Mens Business Grooming Etiquette      Sat 01:00 PM - 03:30 PM
Mens Business Dressing Etiquette            
Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Table Manners  
Sat 09:00 AM - 11:30 AM or                                                  
Mon Wed 05:00 PM -  07:30 PM
                                                         
Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on) mens business grooming etiquette, mens business dressing etiquette, and college and university dining etiquette.

Meal and gratuity included
Free casual and fine dining etiquette lab third Monday of each month for parents and college freshmen
Meal expense and gratuity not included
Listed rates apply for non-freshman
Scholarships available

college & university dining etiquette
call Harold Almon 512-821-2699



Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Advanced Dining Etiquette Harold Almon Reasons for Taking a Class in Business Dinner Etiquette College & University Dining Etiquette II


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon
baesoe.com

Reasons for Taking a Class in Business Dinner Etiquette, because you can. You have a paid, or will pay, for the cost of the food; the way you eat reflects on you and the company you represent.

When asked why attend a class in Business Dinner Etiquette… because you can, & as a friend, "Manners to Etiquette" Students Outshine the Competition.

Confidence and enthusiasm will not stop you from eating badly, etiquette and practice can.

I almost resist adding this, not wishing to offend: remember, Pretty Woman? Advanced rules of etiquette and practice go with that jewelry. Graduates, the same go with that pay check. They make you better company, and allow you to rise in the air in the arena you have elected to enter.

Spend Life Fork Literate Name each Course for Six Forks.

Take a Camp in Business Social Dining Etiquette and in Business Dinner Etiquette.

Each of us lives on a given tier. You do not have to wait to the get to the next tier to prepare. Social skills are presents to a community.

Education and sophistication are our intellectual and social presents to a community. Avoid showing up "One hand just a long as the other, (without anything to offer.)Education is a social passport. A transcript is a ticket to where you get to sit. Etiquette is a key to access: how (you fit and how) long you get to stay.


Education without sophistication leads to isolation. There is a social requirement to academic refinement. Etiquette is a key to access.

Education and sophistication are the air in which we rise. Each tier has a required skill set. Fail to prepare and you will rise in a funnel.

A doctorate without etiquette is an awkward fit, is inadequate. Even you would not want to be around you - if you knew. And now you do- No fear. You have finished this book.

You are one great marketing representative, and poised sure does look good on you.

You can go back and engine search each subject title. Business Dinner Etiquette Lessons continue.

Business and University Dining Etiquette Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Soup as the First Course Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon baesoe.com



Soup can be served as a first course. Soup in a bowl or cup is to be served on an underlying plate. Soup can be served in a soup plate with or without being placed on an underlying plate. The underlying plate may be set atop a show or charger plate.


1. Soup is to be eaten as follows, “As the ship goes out to sea I spoon my soup away from me.” The spoon is to be balanced, loaded, locked, and then lifted to the mouth and the soup taken in from side of it. Avoid blowing soup, (same as for coffee.) Soup that is too hot can be stirred to be cooled. It may be allowed to stand until it is palatable. The bowl or plate may be tipped away from you and a spoon used to get the last of any item in it. You could avoid doing this. Soup served in a cup can be eaten by using a spoon or by picking up the cup by the handle(s) and drinking the item in it in small silent sips (pours.)

2. Soup can be served with croutons or oyster cocktail crackers. Each may be eaten by placing them in the vessel a few at a time and eating them with the soup. Saltine crackers are to be eaten separately from the soup. These crackers can be crumbled into chowder, but this is to be done only at a very informal meal.

3. Soup may be served with a relish tray. Items on it are considered finger foods, and are to be picked up with them. Each person can take up to two of each item and place them on a bread and butter plate.

4. Relish tray items may be placed on the edge of an underlying plate in the absence of a bread and butter plate. Olive pits could be taken out of the mouth with the thumb and the index finger and placed on the left edge of the plate.

5. The rest position for the spoon is handle in the four o’clock position. The finished position for a spoon on a plate is at four o’clock. The finished position for a spoon served with a bowl or cup is on the right side of the underlying plate.

6. Sherry may be served with a soup course. A sherry glass is to be set in formation to the right of the last wine glass. It can be filled half- full, without being lifted from the table. The glass is to be held by the stem in the right hand when drinking from it. It is to be set back in the position for it when the drink is rested or finished. Sherry could be omitted.

Dining Etiquette An Appetizer in Business Dining Business Dinner Etiquette College & University Dining Etiquette II Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
By Harold Almon baesoe.com

An appetizer is essentially a hors d’oeouvre that could be served at the table usually in lieu of or prior to a first course. An amuse bouche is a bite size appetizer that might be provided by a chef at no cost to a patron. It might be paired with a wine. It cannot be ordered from a menu.

Shrimp, oysters, clams, or escargot can be served as an appetizer. The vessel for each can be set atop a show plate. The oyster cocktail fork is placed to the extreme right of the last knife or spoon. It can be placed in the bowl of the soup spoon tines-up, with the handle pointed to five o'clock. An oyster cocktail fork may be placed to the extreme left of the last fork(s.) It could be placed with up to three other forks in a place setting. It is the lone exception to the rule, "only three items of any one kind in a place setting at a time. It can be placed to the right side of an underlying plate when a dish is served to a table. This is also the finished position for the fork.

1. Shrimp is to be impaled onto this fork, dipped into the cocktail sauce and then placed into the mouth. Shrimp that is very large may be bitten off in a manageable bite and then re-dipped into the cocktail sauce.

2. Each oyster is to be served in a half shell. Lemon, if provided, may be squeezed onto it. The oyster is to be detached and lifted from the shell with a cocktail fork before being eaten. It can be chewed.

Informally an oyster can be dipped into a cocktail sauce and then eaten. Oyster crackers may be provided and eaten by being dropped in the cocktail sauce and taken to the mouth with the cocktail fork. Avoid squeezing lemon into the cocktail sauce.

3. Clams are to be eaten whole.

4. Escargot (snail) is to be eaten by holding the shell in the left hand and digging out the body with the use of an oyster cocktail fork held in the right hand and placing it in the mouth whole. Avoid lifting any shell and drinking the juice or butter within when you are at any table set with a real tablecloth.

Note: in a private home, a hinged snail shell holder is to be omitted. The shell can be held with a napkin.

Note: there are other appetizer options; some religions disallow practitioners to have any of the above foods. The only appetizers for a guest are those that can be eaten by each person being entertained.

Note: In an everyday world the appetizer could be Chips and Salsa and or Queso; avoid double dipping the chip.

The appetizer course can be omitted. Enjoy that pre-dinner drink.

Dining Etiquette When to Get Up in Business Dining Business Dinner Etiquette College & University Dining Etiquette II Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon baesoe.com

In a dining room, place your napkin in your chair and get up at the lead of the senior person. Get up

1. In social life, whenever a senior person, visitor, or a woman visits your table. Remain standing as long as a senior person does, or until you are specifically asked to do otherwise. Stand as long as any woman near is standing (even when asked to do otherwise.)

2. In business, a senior woman may say, “This is business, you can sit. (Do it.”) Remain standing as long as any man or peer who is talking remains standing.

3. To answer any woman who is standing who addresses a remark. Stand the entire time anyone in your party is engaged in conversation with a woman at your table, no matter how long. You can even eat standing. You may omit standing, when a woman who is working in public comes to your table, unless she is also a close friend.

4. To be introduced; a woman is to stand for introductions to people senior by position, considerably older, important state officials, and/or their wives, and for clergymen.

5. Get up when someone says "Get up; we need to take a five to ten minute break." What is being done while you are away is called “Correcting the table.”

Before temporarily leaving the table place flatware in the rest (or finished) position for the style in which you are eating; get up from the right, where practical; place your napkin in your chair. Return to your seat from the left, when returning to sit down.

6. Get up or rise halfway, when a woman gets up to leave your table, to acknowledge her departure; you can omit getting up with a woman at table is also a peer, all other women as a rule will forgive you. And get up.

7. At the conclusion of a meeting.
__________
 If you have to leave the table to take care of a personal item: telephone, text, or to handle something on your own.

Leave the table between courses if possible.
lace your napkin in your chair.
Say, “Excuse me.”
Push chair in – when you can.

Dining Etiquette Vegetable Items in Formal Service Business Dinner Etiquette College & University Dining Etiquette II Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 512-821-2699

In formal service, two vegetable items are to be served with a main course. A knife and fork can be used to eat vegetables in the Continental style. A vegetable item may be eaten by being incorporated onto a fork with a meat item prior to it being taken to the mouth. 
An artichoke served as a side dish is to be eaten with the fingers.

1. The leaves are pulled off one at a time and dipped in butter before the meat at the tip of the leaf is pulled through your teeth. Avoid trying to eat the whole leaf.

2. A knife is to be used to scrape off the fuzzy part of the heart. The rest of it can be cut and eaten with a knife and fork.

Asparagus tips served as a side dish without a sauce can be eaten by picking a spear up with your fingers and taking it to your mouth. Asparagus, served with a sauce, is to be eaten with a knife and a fork. You can cut off each tip with a fork and take it to your mouth. Then the shortened stalk could be picked up with your fingers. However, if you do this at a restaurant or dinner party, it may make you go from being a guest to being entertainment. Some people may not want to eat asparagus in public. For some it has a side effect. It can make their urine odoriferous within thirty minutes.

In informal service, a vegetable and a starch item can be served with a main course.

Risotto is be eaten by using a fork or a spoon to push the grains of cooked rice out slightly toward the edge of the bowl, then eating only from the pulled out ring. The course is continued by spreading from the center and eating around the edges in a circle. This will keep it hot – in theory.

Corn on the cob as a side dish is to be eaten while being held with the fingers of the left and right hand. Avoid using those pins to stick into each end of the cob. A meat knife can be used to dress corn: add butter, pepper, and salt. It is then set in the rest position for it.

1. The cob is to be taken to the mouth and the corn eaten a few rows at a time.

2. The dressing process can be repeated for the rest of the dish.

3. At a formal meal, another item can replace each listed dish.

In a commercial dining room only, a vegetable item could be served in a side cup. It might be eaten from this dish. It has been seen transferred to a main course plate and eaten from it. Omit from using a side cup in a private home.

A baked potato is to be eaten using a knife and fork.

1. The knife is to be held in the right hand and used to make an incision lengthwise and crosswise into the potato. Then it is placed in the rest position for it.

Note: A clean fork, not a butter spreader, is to be used to place butter into a baked potato and onto other vegetables. Except for the potato, add butter to vegetables only if you wish to let the hostess know that a less than adequate job was done in the kitchen.

Serving dishes and implements can be used to add sour cream and chives to a baked potato. Then the fork is used to separate and eat the meat from the inside of the potato or to eat the skin right along with the potato.

2. A fork and knife can be used to cut the potato into manageable bites one or two pieces at a time.