Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Rate Sheet Be at Ease School of Etiquette Professional and Graduate University Etiquette

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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512 821-2699

Individual Student Etiquette Lesson Packages
#Classes  # of 40 Minute Lessons $ Per Person/ Investment
Eight   16  $ 450.00   
Four      8  $ 250.00      
Two       4  $ 150.00       
One        2  $ 200.00  New Student Special
One        2  $ 100.00      

Group Class Life Skills Etiquette Lesson Packages
# of  40 Minute Lessons $ Per Person/ Investment
Per card
Twelve     $  114      
Eight         $   84                      

Four          $   44       
Two           $   32            
Two           $   16  Student rate
One            $   19             
Unlimited   $  129  or Free for 4 Weeks with New Student Special

Community Resident Individual Non Student Etiquette Lesson Packages
# Classes  # of 40 Minute Lessons $ Per Person/ Investment
Eight  16   $  950.00       
Four      8  $  400.00   
Two       4   $  250.00         
One       2   $  400.00 Community Resident New Student Special
One       2   $  150.00 

45 Minute Shopping Tours    Unlimited Shopping Tours for 4 Weeks
$ 12 per person or couple      $ 45 per person
1 Free with New Student Special

Friday, September 1, 2017

Job Interview Dining Etiquette Things to Avoid While Eating University Etiquette Dining 101

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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

While eating in company, there are things you want to avoid. Here are some of them.
1. In cocktail service, avoid using a napkin to wrap around your glass or drinking from a stirrer.
2. At table, avoid picking up your napkin until the senior person does so, or touching your food until you receive a signal to dig in.
3. During the meal, avoid wrapping your arm around your plate, eating with your elbows on the table, talking with your mouth too full, slurping, being picky, placing a whole spoon bowl in your mouth, leaving your spoon in your soup bowl or cup when the course is finished, pouring sauce from a sauce boat, using a knife as you would use a saw, placing the knife and fork like a pair of oars, looking like a duck: leaning over your plate each time you take in food, smacking your lips, ignoring your meal partners, wiping your mouth with a napkin in one hand, while holding a spoon, knife, or fork in the other, gesticulating with a fork or knife.
Avoid taking your time, sharing meals" in business, " or asking to, eating everything on your plate, not knowing the company song, not dancing, asking to take any food home with you, placing the napkin on your plate, or in your glass, stacking plates or handing them to any serving staff, pushing a plate away from you (when you are finished,) leaning back in your chair, chewing gum anytime, leaving the table before you are excused, staying in the room when someone says, "We need to take a five to ten minute break," and
4. Taking this all too seriously. (Trust me.)

Saying Thank You Outclass the Competition Professinal and College & University Etiquette Business Dining

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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

The first half of saying “Thank You” is acknowledgement. It is done in two parts (attendance: meeting expectations and verbal acknowledgement. Part a.: physical attendance: you have shown up and have meet expectations.
Part b.: say a verbal thank you: for every event you attend where you did not have to work or pay to attend there is to be verbal acknowledgement, say thank you to the host or hostess in person.
You can say, "Thank you for inviting me", or "Thank you for a wonderful evening." Make it so that your host or hostess is able to say, "I am so glad that you came."
You are still here: no one has said “I am so “very” glad you came. Hearing, “I am so “very” glad that you came,” is not the same thing.
In a commercial environment, when you receive food raw, well done, brunt, stale, old, or salted like a pretzel, you can save a piece (and take a picture) in case you want to tell someone later.
When not at a business dinner, you can send a portion back to be packed “To go” so you can do something with it later: have it to make a stew for the host, or a gift for the health department.
There is more than one way to say, “Thank you so very much, for having me.”



Job Interview Dining Etiquette Which Drinks Mine University Etiquette Dining 101 Outclass the Competition



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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin


It is my wish to assist you in locating the drink which is yours and knowing which drink is mine.
1. “With each hand make an OK sign.
2. Place each hand on the table.
3. Left to right – where you see the “b” is the side for your bread. Where you see “d” is the side for your drink.”
4. To the subject say, “Good night.” That glass to your right is yours. This one is mine.
Avoid making the OK sign in public at other times.
Avoid adding a straw or lid to any glass “For here” to be used inside. Straws can be used in a container or can anywhere. Remember the sign; beverages are to be taken up from the right side using the right hand.

To Take a Drink

When at table, place your eating implements in the rest position for style in which you are eating. Pat the napkin to your lips and place it back on your lap. Then, elbows down and in, take a drink.
Avoid being at table drink in one hand and napkin or food in the other.



Interview Dining Etiquette Spoon Rule of Three Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Professional and College & University Dining Etiquette 101

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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

The rule, "Go from the outside in," is understood to mean, "in kind." When the table is correctly set, first all the knives are set, then all the spoons are set together, placed to the right of the last knife, set bowl-up or bowl-down to match the fork(s,) and the spoon for coffee is omitted from the setting. Here is how the spoon rules work.
The first spoon (1) is to be a cream (round) soup spoon, or a place (table) spoon. The latter is primarily used for soup, melon, or at breakfast for cereal.
The second spoon (2) is to be placed to the left of the first spoon. It can be placed above the place setting, with the handle facing to the right. It is used only for dessert. In formal service, this is a place spoon. A fork to be used with a dessert spoon may be placed below it handle facing to the left.
In a maid-less place setting, the third spoon (3) is (a teaspoon) used for coffee. It may be placed to the right of the last spoon, or to the right of the last knife when no other spoon is used.
When wishing to employ the rule go from the outside in the third spoon could be omitted from the place setting, and be brought in when coffee is served.

Spoon rules follow the Rule of Three: no more than three spoons (or any items of flatware of the same kind) are to be set in any place setting at any one time.


Interview Dining Etiquette A Main Course Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Professional and College & University Etiquette Dining 101



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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

A main course is to be
1. A (Roti) of roasted meat or poultry item.
2. A fish item can be served as a main course item.
3. Tofu may be served as a main course.
4. A baked vegetable item could be served as one.
Each main course is to be eaten using a knife and a fork.
1. It is to be cut, sliced, and eaten from the "Work" area of the plate: the portion closest to the table. The fork is to be used to hold the item in place. The item is to be cut, across the grain, into manageable portions one or two pieces at a time.
2. When the main course item is meat or poultry it can be pressed with a knife to cut the item, and flicked towards the fork and away from any bone present all at one time, and then cut again as each piece is desired during the course of the meal.
Any bone, skin, gristle, and any unwanted portion may be pressed and cut away, picked up by using a fork, or a fork and a knife, and placed to the left side of the plate. At a table, avoid using your fingers to pick up the bone(s) of a meat or poultry item to eat or to gnaw at any remaining meat.

Interview Dining Etiquette Table Manners Professional and College & University Etiquette Dining 101



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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
                                       
A main course is to be
1. A (Roti) of roasted meat or poultry item.
2. A fish item can be served as a main course item.
3. Tofu may be served as a main course.
4. A baked vegetable item could be served as one.
Each main course is to be eaten using a knife and a fork.
1. It is to be cut, sliced, and eaten from the "Work" area of the plate: the portion closest to the table. The fork is to be used to hold the item in place. The item is to be cut, across the grain, into manageable portions one or two pieces at a time.
2. When the main course item is meat or poultry it can be pressed with a knife to cut the item, and flicked towards the fork and away from any bone present all at one time, and then cut again as each piece is desired during the course of the meal.
Any bone, skin, gristle, and any unwanted portion may be pressed and cut away, picked up by using a fork, or a fork and a knife, and placed to the left side of the plate. At a table, avoid using your fingers to pick up the bone(s) of a meat or poultry item to eat or to gnaw at any remaining meat.

Interview Dining Etiquette Rules for Reciprocity The Second Half of Saying Thank You - University Etiquette Dining 101

  
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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin       

The second part of the second half of saying thank you is reciprocity. The rule of reciprocity – is to reciprocate “In kind:” A guest is to extend an invitation to a host or hostess to reciprocate for any event or entertainment for which he or she attended where payment or work was not a requisite.
Mitigate the obligation: only accept invitations for the type of event or entertainment you are willing to give and from people you would like to invite to it (or work or pay a lot.)
The rule or reciprocity is excepted when you accept an invitation to an event where you have or had to pay to attend. Such events are a fundraiser, wedding shower, wedding, dance, or a ball. It can be omitted when you have to work to attend an event, when you cannot reciprocate and that fact was known when the invitation was extended, (and when you are male and single, or you are young.) You are to enjoy and to avoid pushing the latter rules. In social life, the rule of reciprocity could be omitted when the event was an expense account (work) lunch. However, a dinner is to be reciprocated-in kind, and normally in mixed pairs, or the excuse you offer had best be a good one.
Once someone acknowledges the requirement, at the activity, a senior guest can say, “Can I” or “Let me,” and waive it, unless (you) the host insists.
Knowing Business Social Dining Etiquette Lessons Polished Table Manners for College and University Students: what is being signaled and what to signal back, and being aware of how you look when you eat is practical, civil, and the right thing to do.

Interview Dining Etiquette Plate Rules University Etiquette Dining 101



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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
At a business party

1. A plate can be held on the index finger of the left hand and secured by the thumb.

2. At a table, a plate is to be set center the place setting one inch up from the edge of it. Avoid wrapping your arm around it, or holding it on the tips of your fingers; (both of these things I have seen.)

3. If you are served a meal in a soup plate, or in a bowl without an underlying plate, be careful what you get for dessert; you might be given a biscuit.

Interview Dining Etiquette Eating Bread University Etiquette Business Dining



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Harold Almon Etiquette Coach
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

Bread is not a first course. A roll, biscuit, bun, or a muffin is to be at each meal as a sign of hospitality. Bread served as a loaf is to be grasped with a clean napkin and cut in half. One cut half is to be turned, and from the large side is to be cut a few thin slices. Bread is to remain at table until the correction of it: just before serving dessert. Sliced bread at dinner may be economical; it is not etiquette. Sliced bread is for sandwiches and toast. Commercially, bread served with a meal has been seen to be sliced. This is a deviation allowed for the social good.

Avoid eating bread and butter (or olive oil) as a first course. Bread can be provided as atmosphere, but is to be eaten after the main course is served. Bread is to be placed on a bread and butter plate. It can be placed on a dinner plate. It may be preset unbuttered on a tablecloth.
Untoasted bread, cold or hot, that is about to be eaten can be placed on a bread and butter plate. A torn off piece of bread can be held on the bread and butter plate and buttered prior to being eaten. Then this small piece is placed in the mouth using your right hand. Repeat, bread is to be eaten, knife at rest, with the right hand.
Avoid cutting a roll with a knife. Avoid holding a whole roll or piece of bread in the palm of your hand and dressing it. Avoid using bread as a test instrument to see which teeth are intact: showing teeth marks in bread you are eating.
The rest of the bread can be admired now and eaten later. It can be used for croutons or bread pudding, or shared by and with staff. Dream the dream.