Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Business Dinner Etiquette Being Excruciatingly Fork and Glass Literate Professional and College & University Dining Etiquette II



Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
baesoe.com

It is my wish to assist you in being excruciatingly fork literate and considerate. About forks, in current use there are six. You know them as this:

1. Oyster cocktail/ Oyster cocktail
2. Appetizer/ Salad
3. Fish/ Fish w/ a notched left tine
4. Meat/ Main Course Meat/Place/Dinner
5. Salad/ Salad
6. Dessert/ Salad

Someone will tell you about an olive, pickle, butter, and an ice cream fork, so there are at least ten. But if you do not already have them, chances are if you see them; they cannot be obtained, and if they could very few would know how or when to use them.

Name Each Glass

Know the name of each glass -- left to right Water, Red wine, White wine, Sherry, and Champagne (the fluted glass above the others.)

And know the rule of four: of the five no more than (four) glasses are to be set in a place setting at any one time. Each is to be placed according to the size of the plate and order of the course to be used with it.

Business Dinner Etiquette A Place Setting for One a Cover Professional and College & University Dining Etiquette II Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512 821-2699

The line to the table can lead to a place setting for one. It is called a cover; it is to be contained in an area fifteen inches up from the table edge and twelve inches on each side from center. Items in a place setting are to be set based on a likely menu: which courses will be served and when. “It is a road map for a meal.” Maintain a cover or establish one.


1. A folded napkin, six letters (C-E-N-T-E-R,) is to be placed center a place setting or plate in absence of a first course. For special occasions it can be seventeen to twenty-two inches square folded in a signature fold. A folded napkin can be placed to the left of the forks when a first course is to be in place. It is to be untouched by the fork(s.)

A course - also six letters can be preset center a place setting. It may be omitted and be brought in to the table.

2. Flatware is to be placed approximately one inch up from the edge of the table or place mat evenly spaced and in symmetry. The fork, four letters (L-E-F-T,) is to be placed to the left of the plate space. It can be placed tines up or tines down. The place (or meat) knife, five letters (R-I-G-H-T,) is to be placed to the right of the plate space blade facing toward the center.

Each spoon is to be placed to the right of the last knife bowl up or down to match the fork(s.) (The rule has always been, “Go from the outside in - in kind.” In kind means all knives then all spoons-when the spoon for coffee is omitted from the place setting.” The spoon for dessert can placed above the dinner plate, handle to the right.

3. The water glass, five letters, (R-I-G-H-T,) is to be set above the right tip of the knife. When dining in company, there is always to be a glass for water. You can add another glass diagonally to the right of it for what you serve for wine.

Next to each place setting you may place a piece of signature candy. In public, when appropriate, you could get the candy (from the counter) on the way in.

A Place Setting for One – A Cover w/o a Spoon

Spoon rule of three: here is how they work.

The little teaspoon (#3) is for coffee served in a tea cup. It can be omitted, until later.

The round soup spoon (#1) is for cream soup.

When a tablespoon is placed in position #1 it may be for melon, a hearty soup, or for a consommé.

And a tablespoon placed as #2 is for dessert. It can be placed to the left of spoon #1. It may be placed above the plate, handle pointed to the right. No more than three spoons or any flatware item of the same kind are to be placed in any place setting at any one time.

Yes, informally a teaspoon has been seen used for dessert. It does not make it etiquette.

A Pre-Dinner Drink at Table in Business Dining Business Dinner Etiquette Professional and College and University Dining Etiquette II


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512-821-2699


A pre-dinner drink can be omitted at a bar and offered at a table. It is called an aperitif: (an appetite starter.) It is to be placed to the right of all other glasses. In a commercial dining room, a pre-dinner drink is to be placed atop a cocktail napkin when it is served, rested, or finished. It and the napkin can be removed after it is finished.



A guest may be heard to say, “Please order me a drink. I’II be right back,” or “Where can I wash my hands.” A guest could wait to do this until after reading or ordering from a reusable menu. Once someone does this, expect the next act: a visit to the bathroom; it is station six.

Which Drinks Mine

It is my wish to assist you in locating the drink which is yours and knowing which drink is mine.

1. “With each hand make an OK sign.
2. Place each hand on the table.
3. Left to right –“Where you see the “b” is the side for your
bread. Where you see “d” is the side for your drink.”
4. “Better yet left to right: bread left, drink right, solids left,
liquids right, foods served left, drinks served right. Now
about your BMW: (Bread, Meat, and Water, (or Wine,)” to this conversation say, "Good night."
5. That drink to your right is yours. This one is mine.

_________



Avoid making the OK sign in public at other times.
Avoid adding a straw or lid to any glass “For here.”

Remember the sign; beverages are to be taken up from the right side using the right hand.



Water at Table

When a guest is to be at table a water glass is to be set at each setting. The water glass is to be set to the right of the plate space above the tip of the knife. Yes, this is your glass.

When a cold beverage is to be served in addition to water, a water glass can be used for it or a glass specifically named for the beverage to be served may be added to the table. When under a roof “Water for here” is to be served in a glass.

In a private home, each water goblet is to be filled ¾ full prior to the time people come to the table.

In a commercial dining room, water is to be served, after people are seated, from the right.

In informal service, it can be provided when requested and given in a ceramic glass or a cup. Avoid asking for and or using a lid or a straw. At some point, omit the sippy cup and risk that the drink might not tip.

Before taking a drink of any beverage eating implements are to be placed in the rest position for the style in which you are eating. Pat or blot your mouth with the corner of your napkin and return it to your lap.

A water glass is to be picked up by the stem with the right hand, and with elbow down and in, taken to the mouth, and a sip (pour) of water is to be taken.

The rest and finished position for the glass is in the table setting position. At a table, avoid placing a napkin under a water glass.

In a private home, the water glass can be refilled at the table, by a server, or guests from a pitcher on the table, or the hostess can offer it from a pitcher on a sideboard.

In a commercial dining room, the water glass can be refilled by a server without being lifted from the table, but usually not more than twice.

When to Get Up in Business Dining Business Dinner Etiquette Professional and College & University Dining Etiquette II Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
                                         baesoe.com


In a dining room, place your napkin in your chair and get up at the lead of the senior person. Get up

1. In social life, whenever a senior person, visitor, or a woman visits your table. Remain standing as long as a senior person does, or until you are specifically asked to do otherwise. Stand as long as any woman near is standing (even when asked to do otherwise.)

2. In business, a senior woman may say, “This is business, you can sit. (Do it.”) Remain standing as long as any man or peer who is talking remains standing.

3. To answer any woman who is standing who addresses a remark. Stand the entire time anyone in your party is engaged in conversation with a woman at your table, no matter how long. You can even eat standing. You may omit standing, when a woman who is working in public comes to your table, unless she is also a close friend.

4. To be introduced; a woman is to stand for introductions to people senior by position, considerably older, important state officials, and/or their wives, and for clergymen.

5. Get up when someone says "Get up; we need to take a five to ten minute break." What is being done while you are away is called “Correcting the table.”

Before temporarily leaving the table place flatware in the rest (or finished) position for the style in which you are eating; get up from the right, where practical; place your napkin in your chair. Return to your seat from the left, when returning to sit down.

6. Get up or rise halfway, when a woman gets up to leave your table, to acknowledge her departure; you can omit getting up with a woman at table is also a peer, all other women as a rule will forgive you. And get up.

7. At the conclusion of a meeting.
__________
 If you have to leave the table to take care of a personal item: telephone, text, or to handle something on your own.

Leave the table between courses if possible.
lace your napkin in your chair.
Say, “Excuse me.”
Push chair in – when you can.

Graduate Business Etiquette Dinner Get What Was Left at the Table Look Professional As You Eat 2nd Tue


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512-821-2699

An Etiquette Education

"Seek knowledge. Go to college. Stay there until you are through. If they can make penicillin out of mold, that's true," they will make a passport for you to be you. A's are pretty to see. C's equal a degree. A degree is a social passport. It can allow you entry into new country. Your transcript may be your ticket. It could determine where you get to sit. Add a course in etiquette; it might be a key to access: how you fit, what you get to see, and how long you get to stay.

Education without sophistication leads to isolation. There is a social requirement to academic refinement. Get your degree. It is required for long-term stability in an upwardly mobile society. It provides a socially acceptable reason to hang out away from home. It can have little to do with the job that you do. Know your education level. For the rest of your life someone will pay you by it and ask it of you.

Have a major. It can be that your major will support you. It may just be your passport. Your major will allow someone to give you credit, or worse to give you a loan. It can be used to let you take a test for a job, and/or to pay you more for the time you trade for money. "To get a good job, get a good education, (in fields which are hiring.)" Get the certification. Few people will ask you about your GPA or your degree, after you do.

You may have many degrees, as long as one is not a doctorate. Avoid getting a PhD unless your major is a "Hard" science, (here a Masters is the Bobbie prize,) or unless you are willing to be self-employed, to teach, and/or to live off grants or insurance money, and then only if you are lucky.

When you get older, go back and get it. It is a nice passport. It is nice to have someone call you doctor. Pick up a class in etiquette. A doctorate without etiquette is an awkward fit, is inadequate. Even you would not want to be around you - if you knew. And now you do. No fear. Add a course (more than a one day class) in etiquette. Poise is going to look good on you.

In business, you will learn that a degree is only a license to allow someone to let you do what you were already good enough to do, pay you for it, promote you, and to maintain limited liability. An advanced degree is a license to allow you to be a full director in your field, even when the two are non-related. Even from this you will retire.

Have a minor. It is your minor that will give you your freedom. Place in it your passion, your work, and your research. Remember what it was that was important to you, shared with you, and taught to you. While you are busy making money, practice doing the thing(s) that will make you free. If and when your minor gets to be your major you have captured the brass ring.

Follow the work of your minor. Then teach it. Those who can teach do. It is an obligation. Those who cannot teach, teach teachers. What does it matter as long as the word gets out? When you do get to the table, it will be as an equal.

You can not inherit or bequeath a degree. You can get one or to the same place and do the same thing with a good work summary in a field you have pioneered or explored intently and extensively. It takes a lot longer.

Get your degree. You can start with CLEP tests, and with life experience credits. How long can you stay dumb or without one? Until you learn and pass tests. Then who can take knowledge (or your degree) from you? Remember this about education, it is a social passport, even when you are just going home. Etiquette is the rules for the role: skills you need and how to dress for the trip.

Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 512 821-2699

Graduate Business Etiquette Dinner
Tours and Etiquette Lessons
for Professionals and University Graduate Students

9:00 AM - 11:30 AM   **Sun or 
5:00 PM -   7:30 PM     2nd Tue 

Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on) etiquette for business dining, stations and lines, rules for name badge placement, notes on handshaking, something to drink, getting business cards, USA menu number of courses, rules for setting a table, advanced formal place setting, rules for eating Continental Style, How to eat chicken with a knife and fork, rules for saying thank you and more. Two-hour program with 30 minute post-class discussion. 

Business Etiquette Dinner Business Dinner Etiquette (stand alone tour) meal and gratuity included. Early Bird Class and Half Off   Meals and gratuities included.
Semester Etiquette Lessons  Ten weeks of etiquette labs plus limited on line and telephone consultations.
Group rates available.

RSVP day of event to confirm time and location 512-821-2699 **

University Graduate Students Look Better As You Eat Free Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Lesson 3rd Monday School of Etiquette in Austin Harold Almon

Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
512 821-2699

Manners to Etiquette
Students Outshine the Competition



Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette
Look Better As You Eat
Meal and gratuity included
Sat 09:00 AM - 11:30 AM or                                              
Mon or Wed 5:00 PM -  7:30 PM
Professional & University Dining Etiquette

Men's Personal Grooming Etiquette or    
Men's Business Dressing Etiquette            
Sat 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on) mens personal grooming etiquette, or men's business dressing etiquette, and professional and university dining etiquette.

Graduate Students Look Better As You Eat Free Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Lessons Third Monday. Optional $17 Meal expense and gratuity.  Non-graduate students sliding scale rates.
Scholarships available

Professional & university dining etiquette
Harold Almon 512-821-2699



Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Eti - Q Test Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette and Business Dinner Etiquette Things to Learn and Do Manners to Etiquette Students Outshine the Competition


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon 
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin
                                                               baesoe.com

 Eti - Q Test  Professional and University Dining Etiquette and
Business Dinner Etiquette



In addition to, the universal rule for eating in company, "__________before leaving home"

1. Be punctual, _________, whatever this means in your community. (Occasionally show up with a present.)
2.    N/A      Know where to wear that name badge _____________.
3.    N/A      Shake hands the right way__________________.
4.    N/A                         Do introductions (correctly, ______________then _____________ or _____________to ________________
5.    N/A                         Mingle. Be good company. When someone gives you a business card, know what to do with it ____________________________, and what to have to give back. ____________________.
6.    N/A               Know how to respond to an offer of a drink, during daylight. Order _______________. It is easier to say than ________________.
7.    N/A               Learn how to survive a business party: how to hold a napkin, glass, and a plate, in your ____________, functionally.
8. Drink without poking someone in the eye; avoid the crane; raising your elbow to take a drink from a glass.) __________________________. ________ liquid into your mouth, from your wrist. Do this _________.  When not drinking, _______________________________ (And wash your hands before you come to or stay at the table.)
9. Know the current USA menu number and order of courses: ______________, __________, __________, __________, __________. Learn what to do after reading that reusable menu______________________.
10.              Maintain your cover: _________________________, or establish one.
11.     N/A             Know which fork to use: name six, _______________, ______________, ____________, _____________, _______________, ____________, and when.
12. Avoid bread until ____________________________; remember bread is not a first course. Avoid leaving _________________ in bread that you are eating.
13.  Talk. At a family dinner, know an invocation acceptable to your host’s culture.___________________. Keep the people at your table company. (Remember, for some, your conversation is the entertainment.) Talk about things other than work (unless it is the purpose for the meal.) Use your inside voice. Some _______________ can still be in your mouth. Know what to do when someone stops to visit you at table. __________.
14. When seated at a table, place a napkin _____________ before eating or drinking anything. 
15. Look for food to be served (counter-clockwise) from __________ (leaving.) At a table -- look for drinks at table to be served from ________ (refreshing)Know the menu order of courses for the day ______________, __________, __________, and __________. Order something easy: that you know how to eat. Eat in _________ over eating in piles.) Avoid taking too little, or too much, or more in visual calories than those dining around you. Try a little of everything unless restricted by religion, health, or culture.
16.    Eat each meal in an accepted style: ______________or ______________________. _______________ in only one direction, one ____________________ at a time. (Yes, you may eat only one thing at a time.)  Keep your hands on the table. Sit up straight. _____________________________.) Close your mouth around the edge of any fork placed in it. Chew each portion __________________, with your mouth closed, and saver each bite. Taste buds live and digestion begins __________________ not the stomach – yes that’s right. Make as ____________________ as possible.  
17. Pace yourself. Eat each course in such a manner as to finish it___________________. Avoid eating too little, too much, or too fast, or acting as if the meal is to be your last. When at a loss as to how to eat a particular dish________________________________. You can ask ___________________________________?" The lesson most likely will begin with a smile. Take __________ often. Rest the __________________ on the edge of the table. You can rest your elbows on the table __________________. (Continentally, you can talk with a knife and fork in your hands.___________. Learn the rules for water, Bread, and how to eat chicken with a knife and fork.
18. Avoid adding salt or pepper to food, unless it is to ________, _________, _________, ___________, or ______________. When salt is requested, ensure _____________________ Avoid ________________. 
19.  Before temporarily leaving a table, place flatware in ____________________ for the style in which you are eating.  Get up; place your napkin ____________.  Know what to do when someone visits your table_______. Between courses, ________________.  Visit Station Six.
20. At table finishes. Before permanently leaving a table, place flatware in ____________________ for the style in which you are eating.    In public, ___________________ of each course on your plate and of each drink in each glass.  Leave each course plate _____________until it is removed by a waitperson or replaced by the next plate. Look for food to be removed from _____________ (retrieving.)
21. Place your napkin in a mock fold to the___________ (leaving) side of your place setting, (again napkin on the side.)   A napkin is to be crisp at the end. When its time, sing the company song______________. When it is time, dance. Let the host pay (and tip) where required. OK back to class. 
22.    Remember reciprocity, where required. Read and research as much as possible the culture in which you ___________________. Watch each act of eating with an open mind, eye, and heart. Practice diligently. While eating in company, there are things to learn and do. – This is the short course. For answers read the blog, read the book(s), or bring this test to class. N/A items are from the next class.

I know you want - Manners in a minute – done – but just some. Math takes months, both take practice. but Manners to Etiquette that’s the rest of life’s test.

Professional & University Dining Eti - Q Test Things to Learn and Do     Manners to Etiquette Outshine the Competition

Business Dinner Etiquette Look Professional As You Eat Business Etiquette Dinner Amazon.com

Business Dinner Etiquette Business Etiquette Dinner The Short Course Professional and University Dining Etiquette Harold Almon



Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin   
                                     baesoe.com

Look Professional As You Eat
Business Etiquette Dinner 
Things to Learn and to Do   
Manners to Etiquette Students Outshine the Competition

1. Learn how to survive a mocktail party: how to hold a napkin, glass, and a plate, in your left hand, functionally.
2. Drink: (without poking someone in the eye;) keep your elbows and arms down close to your sides. Pour liquid into your mouth, from your wrist. Do this silently. Know how to respond to an offer of an alcoholic drink. During daylight, order a “Virgin” drink over a “Non-Alcoholic one.” It is easier to say. Appear to be drinking less than the host, hostess, or person who is picking up the tap. At an evening event, make any drink Virgin (especially after your first.) When not drinking, keep your right hand warm, dry, and free.
3. Mingle. Be good company. Know where to wear that name badge. Do introductions (correctly,) senior then junior or junior to senior. When someone gives you a business card, know what to do with it and what to have to give back.
4. Learn seats of honor: where to stop at a table. At a family dinner, know an invocation acceptable to your host’s culture.
5. Place a napkin in your lap before eating or drinking anything.
6. Maintain your cover: (place setting for one,) or establish one.
7. Look for drinks to be served from the right (refreshing.) Look for glasses in a place setting to be left in place until after you have left the table, (unless it is a pre-dinner drink served on a napkin, or you are doing very formal dining.) Learn what to do after reading that reusable menu.
8. Look for food to be served (counter-clockwise) from the left (leaving.)
9 Take small amounts of food. (Eat in courses over eating in piles.) Avoid taking too little, or too much, or more in visual calories than those dining around you. Try a little of everything unless restricted by religion, health, or culture.
10. Avoid leaving teeth marks in bread that you are eating. Avoid bread until you receive an entrée; remember bread is not a first course.
11. Eat each meal in an accepted style. Know which fork to use and when and how. Cut items in only one direction, one or two pieces at a time. (Yes, you may eat only one thing at a time.) Avoid eating too little, too much, or too fast, or acting as if the meal is to be your last. Make as little noise as possible.
12. When at a loss as to how to eat a particular dish, watch the person who made or ordered it. You can ask, "How am I to eat this?" The lesson most likely will begin with a smile.
13. Avoid adding salt or pepper to food, unless it is to radishes, celery, corn, a potato or salad. When salt is requested, ensure both pepper and salt are passed.
14. (Sit up straight. Bring food to you.) Close your mouth around the edge of any fork placed in it. Chew each portion twenty-four times, with your mouth closed, and saver each bite. Taste buds live and digestion begins in the month not the stomach – yes that’s right.
15. Place your implements in the rest position for the style in which you are eating, anytime you want.
16. Take a hand rest often. Rest the heels of your hands on the edge of the table. You can rest your elbows on the table - in between courses. (Continentally, you can talk with a knife and fork in your hands. Keep them low.)
17. Talk, in business, some unseen food can still be in your mouth. Keep the people at your table company. (Remember, for some, your conversation is the entertainment.) Talk about things other than work (unless it is the purpose for the meal). Know what to do when someone stops to visit you at table.
18. Pace yourself. Eat each course in such a manner as to finish it along with the person to your right. In public, leave a little something of each course on your plate, and of each drink in each glass. Leave each course plate in position until it is removed by a waitperson or replaced by the next plate. Look for food to be removed from the right (retrieving.) (Avoid helping: passing your plates, unless asked, even when you use to wait tables. At dinner is not the place to display this trait.)
19. When it is time, “Take a break.” Before temporarily leaving the table place flatware in the rest position for the style in which you are eating; get up; place your napkin in your chair. When its time, sing the company song. When it is time, dance. Let the host pay (and tip) where required.
20. Before permanently leaving a table, place flatware in the finished position for the style in which you are eating.
21. Place your napkin in a mock fold to the left of your place setting, (again napkin to the side.) Avoid putting any napkin on your used plate or in any glass. Avoid staking plates or making plates"trash." Get up and push in your chair until it is six inches away from the edge of the table.
22. Say thank you. Then, say thanks again later by note.
23. Remember reciprocity. Read and research as much as possible the culture in which you will be the host. Watch each act of eating with an open mind, eye, and heart. Practice diligently. While eating in company, there are things to learn and do. – Business Dinner Etiquette, Business Etiquette Dinner, this is the short course.

Business Etiquette Dinner Reasons for Taking a Class in Business Dinner Etiquette Professional & University Dining Etiquette II Harold Almon


Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon
baesoe.com
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

Reasons for Taking a Class in Business Dinner Etiquette, because you can; you have a paid, or will pay, for the cost of the food; the way you eat reflects on you and the company you represent.

When asked why attend Business Etiquette Dinner Tours and Etiquette Lessons, the answer then… because you can, & as a friend, "Manners to Etiquette" Students Outshine the Competition.

Confidence and enthusiasm will not stop you from eating badly, etiquette and practice can.

I almost resist adding this, not wishing to offend: remember, Pretty Woman? Advanced rules of etiquette and practice go with that jewelry. Graduates, the same go with that pay check. They make you better company, and allow you to rise in the air in the arena you have elected to enter.

Spend Life Fork Literate Name each Course for Six Forks.

Take a Tour on Casual and Fine Etiquette and on Business Dinner Etiquette.

Each of us lives on a given tier. You do not have to wait to the get to the next tier to prepare. Social skills are presents to a community.

Education and sophistication are our intellectual and social presents to a community. Avoid showing up "One hand just a long as the other, (without anything to offer.) Education is a social passport. A transcript is a ticket to where you get to sit. Etiquette is a key to access: how (you fit and how) long you get to stay.


Education without sophistication leads to isolation. There is a social requirement to academic refinement. Etiquette is a key to access.

Education and sophistication are the air in which we rise. Each tier has a required skill set. Fail to prepare and you will rise in a funnel.

A doctorate without etiquette is an awkward fit, is inadequate. Even you would not want to be around you - if you knew. And now you do- No fear. You have finished this book.

You are one great marketing representative, and poised sure does look good on you.

You can go back and engine search each subject title. Business Dinner Etiquette, lessons continue.

Monday, December 15, 2014

AD Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette Look Better As You Eat Graduate Students Free Austin Food Tours and Etiquette Lessons Mon Outshine the Competition 512-821-2699

Over the Counter Etiquette
by Harold Almon baesoe.com
Be at Ease School of Etiquette Austin

Business Tours and Etiquette Lessons
"Manners to Etiquette
"
Students Outshine the Competition 
                              9:00 AM - 11:30 AM 
                                  1:00 PM -   3:30  PM
                                  
5:00 PM -   7:30 PM     

Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette *
Look Better As You Eat  

Austin Food Tours and Etiquette Lessons
Business and University Etiquette

(stand alone lab) Tour $50.00 
Meal and gratuity included 

Business Dinner Etiquette
Look Professional
As 
You Eat

Graduate Business Etiquette Dinner
Tours and Etiquette Lessons

Professional and University Etiquette II

(stand alone lab) Tour $75.00
Meal and gratuity included

Business Tours and Etiquette Lessons on
Casual and Fine Dining Etiquette 
Business Dinner Etiquette

Graduate Business Etiquette Dinner
Creative Table Setting
Flawless Table Service
Saying Thank You and Giving Bank
Male Dress and Image
Men's Business Dressing Etiquette
Men's Business Suit Etiquette

Tie Tying Etiquette
Black Tie Evening Wear Tuxedo Etiquette 

Male Care Matters 
Men's Personal Grooming Etiquette
Men's Business Social Etiquette
Mid-Section Muscle Management
Mastering Your Away Trip
Career Services 
Business and Economics Etiquette 
Resume Writing Etiquette
Job Preparation Sales Kits
Designing and Using Personal and Business Cards
A Better Business Card
Four Fewer Errors Than on Your Business Cards
Organization Identification Protocols and

 Protocols& workshops on Etiquette Organizing and a "Sense of Style"


Weekend Etiquette Orientation Tour
$250.00  per student 
Ten weeks of etiquette instruction 
or
$250.00  per semester
Ten weeks of etiquette labs 
limited on line and 
telephone consultations
or 
$500  
Twenty weeks ++ of etiquette education 
labs plus free expanded on line and telephone consultations
Group rates available.

Excellent opportunity to learn (or brush up on)

College Graduate Students Look Better As You Eat Free Casual and Fine Dining Austin Food Tours and Etiquette Lessons third Monday.  Optional $17 Meal and gratuity.  Sliding scale rates apply to undergraduates. Scholarships available.    
Group rates and open schedule classes available 

Info http://baesoe.com or call Harold Almon 
Austin Food Tours and Etiquette Lessons 512-821-2699